Paint removal from second hand shed

Location
Cleveland
We’ve bought a second hand portal framed shed that is painted....I’d say 50% of the paint has flaked off but some is fairly stubborn... we want to get it galvanised...is there anything I can apply or a quick way of removing it...I don’t fancy standing there for weeks with the angle grinder
 

HarryB97

Member
We’ve bought a second hand portal framed shed that is painted....I’d say 50% of the paint has flaked off but some is fairly stubborn... we want to get it galvanised...is there anything I can apply or a quick way of removing it...I don’t fancy standing there for weeks with the angle grinder
Find a friend with a shot blaster and borrow it? I thought the steel would be acid dipped before hand so you shouldn't need to strip the paint off?
 
Hydrochloric acid used by galvanizers will not remove paint and therefore any paint left on steel will subsequently protect the base steel from pickling and thus once galvanized all areas that had paint remaining with not be coated in zinc....in short a disaster! ( any decent galvanizer would not accept it in any case!)

As suggested previously, best get the whole lot blast cleaned prior to galvanizing. You well get a thicker coating of zinc as a consequence thus leading to longer life for the structure.

Some industrial painters offer a blasting only service.

IMO you need to be buying second hand buildings for scrap equivalent to gain any real advantage against buying new with all the extra hassle and with no CE traceability and design security new ones deliver.
 
What are the various types of blasting available, and what is the best for this type of situation?
On this sort of material you should use either steel shot or chilled iron grit as its essential to remove all traces of paint before the pickling stage of galvanizing. If you have local industrial paint shop who has an automatic blaster then this would be ideal and maybe cheapest option
 
Does anyone know what sized shot/sand blaster I’d need if I bought a second hand one and did it myself? Cheers
Really depends on what size compressor you have to run it. Bigger pots mean less filling and longer blasting runs. I have the large hodge clemco pot (2040 model no I think) but have different size nozzles depending on whether using own compressor which is 160 cfm or hired in 400 cfm compressor. The difference in work rate between an 8mm (150 cfm) and 12 mm (390 cfm) nozzle is night and day but a 400 cfm compressor is 10k to buy or 300 a week to hire.
The cost of accessories such as helmet and breathing air filter is quite pricey to start but necessary evil as it is a messy job. It is a handy tool but after 8 hours blasting you will realise there are muscles in your neck and shoulder never used. If doing I beams there are places that have a machine where the beam goes in one end and comes out blasted and painted the other.
 

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