Recladding a barn/shed

honeyend

Member
We have some homemade barns/large sheds. They were made many years ago and clad with asbestos with a tin roof, was mainly used for hay storage. The basic structure is sound, it would be perhaps easier to buy in a metal barn but I do not want the nosy neighbours and the planers having their say so we are going to refurbish. I am slowly scaling up and I do not want to have to rush out and buy or rent out.
So my question is, I want a multipurpose livestock building used for rearing calves or lambing, what would you recommend for the bottom and how high and then the rest of the sides?
Recommend a contractor for doing the job, East Angular
If you have any favourite layouts that if you were renting a shed you would look for.
 

Pan mixer

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Near Colchester
We have some homemade barns/large sheds. They were made many years ago and clad with asbestos with a tin roof, was mainly used for hay storage. The basic structure is sound, it would be perhaps easier to buy in a metal barn but I do not want the nosy neighbours and the planers having their say so we are going to refurbish. I am slowly scaling up and I do not want to have to rush out and buy or rent out.
So my question is, I want a multipurpose livestock building used for rearing calves or lambing, what would you recommend for the bottom and how high and then the rest of the sides?
Recommend a contractor for doing the job, East Angular
If you have any favourite layouts that if you were renting a shed you would look for.
Have you thought of a DIY job?

If you are in the sunny East, fill the barn with quadrant bales to use or sell and sort the roof out yourself? Possible telephone numbers to get a contractor in when you are starting.
 

honeyend

Member
Thank you for your replies. At the moment I am more worried about the brittle asbestos than the roof, which is recycled tin so it already has loads of small ventilation holes. For speed I would rather use a contractor as we have already got lots of jobs to do, and winter is coming.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

  • 243
  • 0


Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
Top