Revystar Experience

T C

Member
Location
Nr Kelso
We have used Revystar on Spring Barley at "paint brush" for ramularia and it is disappointing.
We used Adexar type (old stock) as a T2 on wheat and I thought we had too much septoria. My independent agronomist brought some plants from a neighbour who had used Revystar (same variety) and it was dirtier than mine.
Not impressed with the first season without chlorothalanil, could really have done with a couple of seasons trying new chemistry vs old.
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
From another thread:
Revystar isn't all it's cracked up to be. The last 2 low disease years have lulled us in to thinking it's the answer to life after CTL, but it's been found to be seriously wanting this year...

Edit: if Revystar isn't the answer to a serious septoria threat without CTL, then we can kiss two thirds of the 'Recommended List' goodbye, and with such a concentration of wheat varieties across the UK we can kiss the existing genetic disease resistance goodbye shortly afterwards.

Are we at the point of realising that losing CTL will have a massive 'unintended consequence' on our ability to produce wheat profitably, and supply domestic demand?
 

Jim75

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Easter ross
We have used Revystar on Spring Barley at "paint brush" for ramularia and it is disappointing.
We used Adexar type (old stock) as a T2 on wheat and I thought we had too much septoria. My independent agronomist brought some plants from a neighbour who had used Revystar (same variety) and it was dirtier than mine.
Not impressed with the first season without chlorothalanil, could really have done with a couple of seasons trying new chemistry vs old.

Any untreated areas for comparison?
 

Hjwise

Member
Mixed Farmer
We have used Revystar on Spring Barley at "paint brush" for ramularia and it is disappointing.
We used Adexar type (old stock) as a T2 on wheat and I thought we had too much septoria. My independent agronomist brought some plants from a neighbour who had used Revystar (same variety) and it was dirtier than mine.
Not impressed with the first season without chlorothalanil, could really have done with a couple of seasons trying new chemistry vs old.
I’m very disappointed with it. Again, nothing scientific to back it up but won’t be using next year. What rate did you use?
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
No, just a feeling that it may not be all it was promised to be.
I’m sure you read it too, but the report in last weeks FW mentioned that it wasn’t just a Septoria issue as there typically isn’t a lot of pycnidia black spots, but that michrodochium nivale was infecting leaf tissue too. It might just be a ‘one off’ year, or it might not…
 

Andy26

Moderator
Location
Northants
Dissapointing performance here as a T2 on Skyfall, both Septoria and yellow rust seemed hardly touched by it.
The dose response curves bore little resemblance to how it performed in the field.

I did wonder if there was something wrong with the batch, it was that bad.
 

beltbreaker

Member
Location
Ross-shire
I am happy with Revystar in comparison to the untreated plots. Only one fungicide this year and my barley is cleaner than the AHDB Rolls Royce treated plots
I also sent some away for DNA analysis which came back low pressure although I did it too late as they struggled for sap.
Septoria on the other hand I am seeing a lot more than normal but this year but this is the brave new world we are in. New fungicides next year look interesting but how long can we keep on this treadmill🤔
 

Sandy

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Revystar is a very expensive can of pee waste of time on spring barley where the Folpet which most people said was the same are wrong crops are green as grass with Folpet no disease
 

Nzed

Member
Arable Farmer
We have used Revystar on Spring Barley at "paint brush" for ramularia and it is disappointing.
We used Adexar type (old stock) as a T2 on wheat and I thought we had too much septoria. My independent agronomist brought some plants from a neighbour who had used Revystar (same variety) and it was dirtier than mine.
Not impressed with the first season without chlorothalanil, could really have done with a couple of seasons trying new chemistry vs old.
It stinks as well which is annoying for public perception
 

shakerator

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
LINCS
The era of chemical agriculture and answers in cans is ending. Seems to have worked okay here but for how long?
The treadmill of our own making is going to fast now and agronomy needs to head down different paths.

why do you think it’s ending ? In my view it’s just changing away from post patent products / imported produce from less regulated origins ....it doesn’t look as though our government is interested in the Swiss model of subsiding food quality ?
 

Against_the_grain

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
S.E
The era of chemical agriculture and answers in cans is ending.
No chance. The big Ag chem companies will make sure of it. What they will do though is breed certain chemically resistant traits into varieties and then sell you the answer in a can, in a similar vain to clearfield OSR. Seed traits combined with chemical tolerance have been and will be the hot topic for the next generation.
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
why do you think it’s ending ? In my view it’s just changing away from post patent products / imported produce from less regulated origins ....it doesn’t look as though our government is interested in the Swiss model of subsiding food quality ?
I’m just talking about the way I think the science should go. Relying so much on chemicals which stop working very quickly appears to breaking. I don’t think anything needs subsidising not sure what any of that’s got to do with anything.
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
No chance. The big Ag chem companies will make sure of it. What they will do though is breed certain chemically resistant traits into varieties and then sell you the answer in a can, in a similar vain to clearfield OSR. Seed traits combined with chemical tolerance have been and will be the hot topic for the next generation.
Agree this is probably what will happen and we will remain in thrall to stuff which breaks. Unfortunately there’s no money in deploying science to find methods that aren’t so breakable. Hence the merry go round continues!
 

shakerator

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
LINCS
I’m just talking about the way I think the science should go. Relying so much on chemicals which stop working very quickly appears to breaking. I don’t think anything needs subsidising not sure what any of that’s got to do with anything.

I dislike relying on silver bullets as much as anyone - but the are they cheaper than addressing the root causes of many problems ?
 

Speculative coverage on the gene editing consultation response

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Speculative coverage on the gene editing consultation response

Written by Defra Press Office

image-of-a-field-620x413.jpg


There has been coverage today in the I and the Guardian, reporting on speculation around the upcoming government response to the recent Gene Editing consultation, which closed on 17th March.

A full government response, which will include a thorough analysis and summary of the responses to the consultation and which will set out our next steps, will be published in due course.

Gene editing has the ability to harness the genetic resources that mother nature has provided, such as breeding...
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