Ryegrass

So we’ve only got Defy - see attached, but having applied this in the autumn we’ve now got ryegrass come back through so we must be resistant to that as well.

Tried ploughing and it doesn’t work.
Tried No-Till and that doesn’t work.
Tried spring crops and they aren’t working.
Tried maize and it made it worse - possibly a combination of ploughing and herbicides.
Always clean in potatoes if the soils light enough to grow them but you can’t have pots every year.

Last time we tried avadex on winter wheat it made little difference but never tried it on spring wheat direct drilled? 🤷🏻‍♂️

The problem is getting worse not better.

Where we’ve had BG before we’ve successfully controlled that via spring cropping but this approach isn’t working for ryegrass.

Short term grass has helped BG massively as well so wondering if it’s worth a try with RG? If so what type of grass seed to use that will produce decent silage and hay whilst also combatting the ryegrass weed issue.
 

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Against_the_grain

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
S.E
Delayed drilling (end of October only after a good flush)
Stacking pre ems (STRONG mix (pdm,flu,prosulfocsrb, dff, wetter) and need moisture to work properly)-be prepared to go back peri/post em.
Rotation (spring crops)
Rotational ploughing

In that order

We used to silage wheat fields because there was more grass than wheat.

Reasonably clean farm now

Tried grass leys. Didnt work for us
 
Delayed drilling (end of October only after a good flush)
Stacking pre ems (STRONG mix (pdm,flu,prosulfocsrb, dff, wetter) and need moisture to work properly)-be prepared to go back peri/post em.
Rotation (spring crops)
Rotational ploughing

In that order

We used to silage wheat fields because there was more grass than wheat.

Reasonably clean farm now

Tried grass leys. Didnt work for us

None of that works here unfortunately. It’s worse than BG.
 

juke

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
DURHAM
if you have had decent control in tatties, is it worth trying the newer bayer pre em formulations including metribuzin on wheat as part of a stack?, or worth trying axial in thespring as a last chance hotel ?
 
Ryegrass has always been a bigger problem in my part of France than Blackgrass.

We just about keep on top of it by drilling cereals later and trying to using 3 different actives in the autumn preferably in two hits i.e. pre emergence and at 1 to 2 leaves (by three leaves the residuals start to lose efficiency) and using Kerb every other year in beans and rape. Last year it was 3 litres of Defy then 0.6 Battle Delta (Liberator to you). A lot is made here of DFF complementing Defy on ryegrass, though not really a grass weed product it seems to enhance Defy and is not expensive. I forget does the UK still have Dicurane? Its only allowed here at low doses (1800g/ha) but is a good mixer and is the only residual that's worth using after three leaves.

We also don't put wheat into our worst fields. Knee high modern wheats don't compete so the worst land is in triticale. Triticale is worth 10 euros a Tonne less than wheat but the difference in price is offset by savings in herbicides and better straw sales. Some say hybrid barley is good too though never tried it. Our six row barley we grow for bull fattening never seems as bad as our wheat.

We still get some effect from Axial but it is a very hard to get the timing right. Current advice is ideally 10 degrees and upwards at application, 70% humidity minimum, its sunlight activated so needs a sunny day, no frost either side of treatment for five days and no Min Max temp difference greater than 15 degrees for 5 days after treatment. All of which means that there may only be one or two days in march that are suitable and even then only for a few hours each day.
 
Do you know were the Ryegrass has come from to get in to your fields


Million dollar question and simple answer is no not really. I don’t think the ww/osr rotation helped in the ‘min till’ fad era.

What’s annoying though is we’ve controlled BG through rotation, continual spring cropping and direct drilling. Sadly with ryegrass none of that works. It just keeps coming back.

I think we need a none evasive short term grass that’ll overtake it.
 
Nothing to do with the “low input“ system you’ve been harping on about in here for years, Lee??

That’s not very constructive but I couldn’t resist a dig!

I don’t know, is it 🤷🏻‍♂️? Can’t see how it would be because we’ve never scrimped on herbicides because you can’t.
 
Well you are doing it wrong then

25 years+ experience of working with RRR Italian ryegrass and only in the last 10 since we have fully adopted ALL of the previous tactics has it become manageable. I'm only offering advice so take it or leave it

We haven’t drilled before the end of oct for years and always glyphosate first at full rate (never used glyphosate at anything other than full rate). Tried rotational ploughing. Tried continual spring cropping.

One rotational question is we’ve dumped osr. The worst RG fields haven’t had osr for 10 years without checking and haven’t grown beans for probably 20 years.
 
Last edited:

will l

Member
Mixed Farmer
Million dollar question and simple answer is no not really. I don’t think the ww/osr rotation helped in the ‘min till’ fad era.

What’s annoying though is we’ve controlled BG through rotation, continual spring cropping and direct drilling. Sadly with ryegrass none of that works. It just keeps coming back.

I think we need a none evasive short term grass that’ll overtake it.
It is in alot of continental seed, grass and cover crops, as well! Be careful make sure your grass seed isnt contaminated
 

GeorgeK

Member
Location
Leicestershire
Do you know were the Ryegrass has come from to get in to your fields
In bags of grass seed because as far as I can see there are no checks or controls that prevent a farm with resistant grass from growing seed and distributing the problem round the country. In fact a few months ago the FW had an article about a seed grower struggling with resistant grass, and yes he was still selling seed which would have been bagged up and sold to unsuspecting farmers.
Any seed growers should be certified resistance free and this madness stopped.
 
In bags of grass seed because as far as I can see there are no checks or controls that prevent a farm with resistant grass from growing seed and distributing the problem round the country. In fact a few months ago the FW had an article about a seed grower struggling with resistant grass, and yes he was still selling seed which would have been bagged up and sold to unsuspecting farmers.
Any seed growers should be certified resistance free and this madness stopped.

We mostly farm save seed but the worst RG fields haven’t ever been down to grass so it’s not come in in grass seed.
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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