Tile feed trough

farmer1989

Member
Location
cumbria
Looking for pictures and advice on putting tiles down in old feed traughs the does and donts much appreciated

Eg... thin set mortar or adesive, leave a gap and grout or push together, what thickness,
Pressure wash old traugh before or does it need to be bone dry ?
 

farmer1989

Member
Location
cumbria
Not cost effective to polish the old concrete down in our old traughs also epoxy resin is not cheap got a job lot pallet of tiles for almost nothing so using them but appreciate the sugestion
 

stablegirl

Member
Location
North
More or less as you said, inch or 2 of motar, biggest tiles you can get, leave slight gap roughly grout.

We have one done been done 15 years, odd tiles cracked where cows have fallen in the trough or something, bit doesnt make any odds.

Well worthwhile.
 
Location
Cheshire
You’ll pay for the resin with the time saving any end up with a more durable finish.

Clean, acid etch, self level screed (if not smooth), roller on resin.
 

farmer1989

Member
Location
cumbria
You’ll pay for the resin with the time saving any end up with a more durable finish.

Clean, acid etch, self level screed (if not smooth), roller on resin.
[/QUOTE
Tried epoxy paint 2 year ago its allready coming off think the screed be a perfect job but im fully housed and getting the concrete prepped inside a traugh would take forever plus its a flatbottom with a wedge pushing feed back to cows with tiles i can do 20ft at a time
 
Location
Cheshire
We used it on new concrete, so we used a concrete planer to take the top off after it had dried out. On old concrete I would power wash then plane it. It really sticks down hard.
 

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How to mitigate heat stress in cattle

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Written by John Swire

With temperatures forecast to rise above 25°C, cattle producers should be prepared to mitigate the negative effects of heat stress on their beef and dairy animals.

“Cattle are fairly comfortable when the ambient temperature is between 15°C and 25°C over the summer months but if the thermometer rises significantly, production performance will start to suffer,” warns Jacob Lakin from Azelis Animal Nutrition.

“This is because both a milk production and growing beef animal will start to divert energy away from production performance towards keeping cool. You’ll notice if a cow is struggling during a summer heatwave because she will start to salivate heavily and pant...
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