Toll rides off road trust

Location
Warwick
One of our landlords was into it about 10-15 years ago.
It didn't last long although it did seem a good idea, maybe it was the wrong location ?
Users had a fluorescent band around their riding hats to prove that they had paid
 

flowerpot

Member
The Toll Ride Trust has been going for many years, particularly in Kent and the south-east. It is charity and was set up (by a farmer's wife) to help riders and farmers create riding routes by providing the membership document and administering subscriptions and payments to farmers calculated on the length of route on their land. Liability is one of the first things that landowners question, but the "local agent" - the rider who will liaise between riders and farmers - will carry out a risk assessment and the agreement that the riders sign does as much as possible to mitigate the possibility of liability, although all landowners have a duty of care, of course.

You won't make a fortune as it won't be used by masses of people in fact you would probably say that you never see anyone, but they will be there! Simple maintenance like an occasional roll and keep vegetation cut back makes it more attractive and hence more members. Some routes in Kent are up to 20 miles long and join up bridlepaths, quiet lanes and avoid busy roads, which might be narrow B roads carrying a lot of traffic. These longer routes go over several different farms to make a longer joined up route. There is nothing nicer than riding behind a hedge while lorries thunder past on the other side. A toll ride is more for local hacking than a "destination" ride where people will turn up in a horsebox and want to go out for a couple of hours and which need more input from the farmer.
 

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Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

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Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

Written by Freya Herring

Dairy farmers cash in on a growing trend to replace both homogenisation and plastic with a revival of the traditional ways
“When the milk price crashed five years ago, we were in a bad...
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