Any Vets on here? got a cat with gallstones!

ACEngineering

Member
Location
Oxon
Are there any Vets on here please? The much loved family kitty is rather poorly, She's at the local vets and turns out she has gallstones! there are some smaller ones she will hopefully pass but there is one big one she wont, they say if the big one stays where it is and she can pass the smaller ones she should be okay🤞 IF not she would need a specialist operation which they say is difficult and high risk, i get the feeling this is not something the local vet can do in house, and i have no doubt very expensive! She's 14 years old now i think and so sadly i think the operation will not be an option for her in her old age?

It would appear rare in a cat so just wondering if there is any vets on here and if they have come across this problem before?
 

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Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
Insured? Actually, I’m not sure it matters. I wouldn’t put an aged cat through a serious operation like that. I’d be saying goodbye and letting it sleep.

Whatever you decide, make sure it’s what’s best for your cat and not for you.

Best wishes.
 

ACEngineering

Member
Location
Oxon
Insured? Actually, I’m not sure it matters. I wouldn’t put an aged cat through a serious operation like that. I’d be saying goodbye and letting it sleep.

Whatever you decide, make sure it’s what’s best for your cat and not for you.

Best wishes.
No not insured, and yes cost a side i dont think its fair to her. Just a shame as other than a few missing teeth shes in really good shape for her age.
 

Cowgirl

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Ayrshire
Yes I have seen them in cats. Is she jaundiced? Has she got a high temperature? Presumably she has cholangiohepatitis. They can be successfully removed by referral surgeon. How were they diagnosed? Are they actually the cause of the problem?
 

ACEngineering

Member
Location
Oxon
Yes I have seen them in cats. Is she jaundiced? Has she got a high temperature? Presumably she has cholangiohepatitis. They can be successfully removed by referral surgeon. How were they diagnosed? Are they actually the cause of the problem?
She did have a high temp yes but went back down yesterday.

They did a scan on her expecting to see liver problem but found found gallstones instead.
No jaundice.
Blood test did indicate a liver problem but they can see anything wrong with it and think its cause shes not been eating or drinking properly?
 

ACEngineering

Member
Location
Oxon
Yes I have seen them in cats. Is she jaundiced? Has she got a high temperature? Presumably she has cholangiohepatitis. They can be successfully removed by referral surgeon. How were they diagnosed? Are they actually the cause of the problem?
I had to google cholangiohepatitis!
Yes I believe they will be giving her antibiotics possibly for that but I dont remember specifically cholangiohepatitis being mentioned? they want her to start eating again first so were going to tempt her with some fish and other smelly stuff!
 

Cowgirl

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Ayrshire
Cholangiohepatitis is quite common - often linked with inflammatory bowel disease and pancreatitis in cats, and it may be pancreatitis causing loss of appetite - the stones may not actually be causing a problem. Jaundice is a more serious indication of possible bile duct blockage with a stone. Most cats can be treated medically with fluids, antibiotics and pain relief - good luck!
 

ACEngineering

Member
Location
Oxon
Cholangiohepatitis is quite common - often linked with inflammatory bowel disease and pancreatitis in cats, and it may be pancreatitis causing loss of appetite - the stones may not actually be causing a problem. Jaundice is a more serious indication of possible bile duct blockage with a stone. Most cats can be treated medically with fluids, antibiotics and pain relief - good luck!
Just to update vet rang this morning, Her condition got worse overnight and she had turned yellow with jaundice and wouldn't even look at food so we had to put her to sleep this afternoon and shes now laid next to an old friend in the garden.

Many thanks for your comments.
 

Get ready for pest monitoring, advises PGRO

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham

The Processors and Growers Research Organisation (PGRO) has issued new advice to help growers understand the importance of measuring pest populations before any decisions are made on insecticides. Charlotte Cunningham reports. Ahead of the trapping season, the PGRO has produced a new masterclass video to help growers understand how to trap and assess pest populations. The key advice is that using a range of preventative tools will be crucial for farmers looking to reduce cases of pea and bean weevil, pea moth, and silver Y moth this spring, while finding more sustainable ways of farming in line with new agricultural policy, according to the PGRO’s research and...
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