Crovect is it effective?

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Crovect - or Ectofly, Molecto, Vectocert...

Good product, depending on how bad your fly troubles are.
Minus the hill lambs, which were done in April with Dysect - I am only now putting pour on, on my lambs.

Used Vectocert for the last 4-5 years, IMO it's the best for the job - factoring in cost, withdrawal, cover and manufacturer...
 

glensman

Member
Location
North Antrim
Crovect - or Ectofly, Molecto, Vectocert...

Good product, depending on how bad your fly troubles are.
Minus the hill lambs, which were done in April with Dysect - I am only now putting pour on, on my lambs.

Used Vectocert for the last 4-5 years, IMO it's the best for the job - factoring in cost, withdrawal, cover and manufacturer...
I take it you don't use clik at all?
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
I take it you don't use clik at all?

No.

I'd need to put it on in May, to assure my first lambs could go away early July. My first lambs left in June...

I don't need fly cover until now. But even now it's still minimum (iv gone years and not used any pour on). Short withdrawal, and works well IMO is very flexible for selling fat lambs.


On principal (except for Vecoxan), I will not buy from Elanco.
 

JHT

Member
Location
Wales
Ectofly gives me a serious headache and makes my throat swell up- but I'm fine with Crovect. I always assumed it was exactly the same stuff? Different carrier maybe. I absolutely hate the stuff and only use it for odd cases of strike or prevention on a few odds and sods. Clik on all the lambs- ridiculously expensive but great to work with and great peace of mind.
 

Poorbuthappy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Devon
No.

I'd need to put it on in May, to assure my first lambs could go away early July. My first lambs left in June...

I don't need fly cover until now. But even now it's still minimum (iv gone years and not used any pour on). Short withdrawal, and works well IMO is very flexible for selling fat lambs.


On principal (except for Vecoxan), I will not buy from Elanco.
The fact that you have been able to get away without cover some years, and your location, suggests to me why you can get successful use of crovect type products.
Plenty people down here in the sw struggle to get any meaningful cover from it. Largely due to difficulty of getting good cover rather than a true failure of the product I suspect
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
The fact that you have been able to get away without cover some years, and your location, suggests to me why you can get successful use of crovect type products.
Plenty people down here in the sw struggle to get any meaningful cover from it. Largely due to difficulty of getting good cover rather than a true failure of the product I suspect
Yeah, hence why I said this in my first post:

Good product, depending on how bad your fly troubles are.


All depends on location, altitude, what you want and need it to do.
It works well for me, so I can have no complaints.(y)

Also, apart for making me sneeze a few times - it doesn't irritate me.
 
Mine had their first Crovect yesterday - mainly for the lambs tbh (ewes nearly a month past shearing). That will take me to the beginning of September when I'll be applying to prevent ticks. Yesterday was the first time I'd really felt I got good cover - holding the spray at the right distance more than anything and having the animals really stationary. I wear full waterproofs and a mask and gloves - it's the one job I'd happily never do again with the sheep. Even the early flies this year haven't persuaded me to go for earlier treatment next year but I only have a few so can factor in more checks and it was only the adults. (Although the Ram From Hell has let himself down again by having lambs more prone to strike!)
 
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banjo

Member
Location
Back of beyond
Used it for years and it's good, after 6 weeks though it's like it stops working instantly.
I've had trouble this year with it myself though, had quite a few lambs with maggots when it's been put on
( I remember reading somewhere they have a new click out, maybe the normal one is weaker now trying to push everyone onto the other ? )
 

Bob the beef

Member
Location
Scot Borders
Ther was some really good stuff on the here a few weeks back about each product and active ingredient and what each one will and will not prevent. Worth searching for. Was about the beginning of July I think
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Used it for years and it's good, after 6 weeks though it's like it stops working instantly.
I've had trouble this year with it myself though, had quite a few lambs with maggots when it's been put on
( I remember reading somewhere they have a new click out, maybe the normal one is weaker now trying to push everyone onto the other ? )
You're almost as cynical as me.:D 'Normal' Clik is just the same. Clik Extra just has more ai so it lasts a few weeks longer. Useful if you live in those tropical areas where the grass grows all year round and the fly season is longer.
 

Ysgythan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Ammanford
As per title, I assume many of you have used it, how effective did you find it to be?
Yes, as long as you appreciate it's shortcomings (only protects sprayed area and is short term) and don't think of it as doing the same as Clik (which spreads over the body and gives longer protection) just more cheaply.
 
For ewes, every year I divide the cost of the pack by the number of doses it does. Then divide that by the expected weeks of cover. The IGR's (CLiK et al) do what they say they will do as long as they are applied correctly but with the SP's (Crovect etc...) this is less time-specific. Based on CLiK at an average market price around here, Crovect or generic version, covering for 6 weeks, would need to be less than £60/5ltr. CLiK has never been beaten by that measurement, (cost/ewe/week) in our area where we need as long cover as possible.
 

twizzel

Member
if theres a lamb bad with maggots will a few sprays of crovect kill them or am I better to shear the lamb and pick off every maggot then spray?
Clip the area till you get to clean fleece and get as many out as you can, then spray with Crovect and come back an hour later to find more dead ones that you didn't even see when you clipped first of all :nailbiting:
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
if theres a lamb bad with maggots will a few sprays of crovect kill them or am I better to shear the lamb and pick off every maggot then spray?
The ew times iv had a struck ewe//lamb, I don'tr the struck area, or remove any maggots...

Just spray a good amount over the struck area making sure the wool is all covered/soaked to the skin.

Let the barstewards die. By the time your done, you will see the maggots evacuating the sheep.
 
You're almost as cynical as me.:D 'Normal' Clik is just the same. Clik Extra just has more ai so it lasts a few weeks longer. Useful if you live in those tropical areas where the grass grows all year round and the fly season is longer.
Didn't @bovine say they were in different "carrier" liquids which affected the way they work and hence accounted for a difference in cost or do I dream?

Also @GTB do you use it for ticks all season? If so what application pattern do you use is it always the tick one? I'm asking because normally I don't have to worry about ticks until August but there was a lot about in the early part of this season and I was wondering about treating but then they seemed to drop back to insignificant levels.
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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