Fazor Banned on Stock Feed Potatoes

California

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
South Lincs
Just had an email from AHDB saying that the the label has changed on all Maleic Hydrazide products (Fazor, Source etc.) to say that potatoes treated with it can no longer be fed to stock.
So apparently they are fine for human consumption but not for feeding to animals! I'm sure there must be some science of some sort behind it but it does seem a little crazy.
As growers of chipping potatoes MH is a pretty vital part of stopping them sprouting in store and we usually just give outgrades to local stock farmers (and have done for many years), Guess we'll have to dump then now which seems very wasteful.
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
It could be down to licensing where the manufacturer has gone for the bare minimum on the license to keep it and produce trial data..
There’s a lot of sprays certified for sugar beet but not for fodder beet, purely because there is less “need” for them for fodder beet and the returns from FB wouldn’t cover the trial work for the licensing..
 

Fubar

Member
It's going to cause a lot of headaches. Most outgrades are fed to cattle round here. Maybe have to look for a digester go take them now. Dumping them and the problems that leads to is not an option.
 

Full of bull(s)

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
But the potatoes are fine for human consumption...????

Maybe it’s to do with the muck when it comes out the other end of livestock. There is a grassland spray can’t remember the name, that if used on silage ground it stays in the grass, goes through the cattle and if the manure is then spread on potato ground the following year it will wipe out the crop. I guess not too many people spread their own??
 

California

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
South Lincs
Maybe it’s to do with the muck when it comes out the other end of livestock. There is a grassland spray can’t remember the name, that if used on silage ground it stays in the grass, goes through the cattle and if the manure is then spread on potato ground the following year it will wipe out the crop. I guess not too many people spread their own??
Just read the AHDB info and apparently the reason "new label" product can't be used (old label is fine) is due to a "data gap in the latest round of product reviews" It has nothing to do with any risk of harm to stock or the following crop presumably as it states on the AHDB website that imported potatoes treated with MH can be fed to livestock with no issues and likewise any potatoes treated with the same product but the old label.
It's another of those crazy but very worrying situations unfortunately!
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
Just read the AHDB info and apparently the reason "new label" product can't be used (old label is fine) is due to a "data gap in the latest round of product reviews" It has nothing to do with any risk of harm to stock or the following crop presumably as it states on the AHDB website that imported potatoes treated with MH can be fed to livestock with no issues and likewise any potatoes treated with the same product but the old label.
It's another of those crazy but very worrying situations unfortunately!

So it’s a licensing problem like I said then....
 

B'o'B

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Rutland
Maybe it’s to do with the muck when it comes out the other end of livestock. There is a grassland spray can’t remember the name, that if used on silage ground it stays in the grass, goes through the cattle and if the manure is then spread on potato ground the following year it will wipe out the crop. I guess not too many people spread their own??
That would likely be Clopyralid. We had a field of beans wiped out after feeding beet pulp to cattle and spreading the muck.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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