Fund raiser for BYDV because I was told that it's a figment of my imagination

Chalky

Member
I do not think there is that much that the boffins have not been telling us for the last 40 years really. Cereals drilled in autumn will be at risk of virus vectors migrating into newly sown crops from summer host plants in the autumn until flights cease, dependent upon location around early November. Emerged crops are at risk in the period so treat with a suitable pyrethroid. Repeat if the prevailing conditions continue to pose a risk. Worst areas are coastal and southern counties.

You have all read it all before-unfortunate to get caught out do not think I am being unkind-but as agriculture may change, I do not think the natural world is forced to follow.

Social media warriors are often very unhelpful preaching about subjects like this-beneficials etc. Come October and weather turns I find most lacewings and ladybirds in the crevices of doors and windows, not foraging around my cereal crops. We had a field near a grass paddock caught about 10 years ago, should have treated again(in hindsight) as was a nild run into December. I did not consider it. Glad I gave it the first one though, as 8t/ha would have been worse! We are 3 miles south of the Humber. The same year a swathe north of Lincoln either side of the A15 was hit badly.

I am over 50-my thoughts may differ from younger members-I do not know
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
we drilled early this year and have not suffered apart from the odd low lying spot next to ponds, alot was drilled into thick catch crops. i had traps out but mainly caught lacewing type things through october. we have got away with it this year but thats not to say we wont fall foul in the future. all we can do is try and encourage beneficials as much as possible, they will surely be resistant to pyrethroids soon?
 
I do not think there is that much that the boffins have not been telling us for the last 40 years really. Cereals drilled in autumn will be at risk of virus vectors migrating into newly sown crops from summer host plants in the autumn until flights cease, dependent upon location around early November. Emerged crops are at risk in the period so treat with a suitable pyrethroid. Repeat if the prevailing conditions continue to pose a risk. Worst areas are coastal and southern counties.

You have all read it all before-unfortunate to get caught out do not think I am being unkind-but as agriculture may change, I do not think the natural world is forced to follow.

Social media warriors are often very unhelpful preaching about subjects like this-beneficials etc. Come October and weather turns I find most lacewings and ladybirds in the crevices of doors and windows, not foraging around my cereal crops. We had a field near a grass paddock caught about 10 years ago, should have treated again(in hindsight) as was a nild run into December. I did not consider it. Glad I gave it the first one though, as 8t/ha would have been worse! We are 3 miles south of the Humber. The same year a swathe north of Lincoln either side of the A15 was hit badly.

I am over 50-my thoughts may differ from younger members-I do not know
I like you am not always convinced by the beneficial theory. Although they are important and should be protected as much as possible they are never going to wipe out a sudden in flux of aphids. This has clearly been shown in the case of virus yellows, bydv etc. In my eyes pests are the biggest threat to crop production, more so than weeds and disease.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
I do not think there is that much that the boffins have not been telling us for the last 40 years really. Cereals drilled in autumn will be at risk of virus vectors migrating into newly sown crops from summer host plants in the autumn until flights cease, dependent upon location around early November. Emerged crops are at risk in the period so treat with a suitable pyrethroid. Repeat if the prevailing conditions continue to pose a risk. Worst areas are coastal and southern counties.

You have all read it all before-unfortunate to get caught out do not think I am being unkind-but as agriculture may change, I do not think the natural world is forced to follow.

Social media warriors are often very unhelpful preaching about subjects like this-beneficials etc. Come October and weather turns I find most lacewings and ladybirds in the crevices of doors and windows, not foraging around my cereal crops. We had a field near a grass paddock caught about 10 years ago, should have treated again(in hindsight) as was a nild run into December. I did not consider it. Glad I gave it the first one though, as 8t/ha would have been worse! We are 3 miles south of the Humber. The same year a swathe north of Lincoln either side of the A15 was hit badly.

I am over 50-my thoughts may differ from younger members-I do not know

I remember watching a bit on Countryfile a few months ago where a big arable farmer was saying how he hadn't used an insecticide for several years and that encouraging beneficials had negated the need. A couple of minutes later the same guy was saying that OSR hadn't been good and that he'd had to spray it all off. :scratchead: I did chuckle.
I know Roundup is cheap, but surely not as cheap as a well timed insecticide?
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
I remember watching a bit on Countryfile a few months ago where a big arable farmer was saying how he hadn't used an insecticide for several years and that encouraging beneficials had negated the need. A couple of minutes later the same guy was saying that OSR hadn't been good and that he'd had to spray it all off. :scratchead: I did chuckle.
I know Roundup is cheap, but surely not as cheap as a well timed insecticide?
What well timed insecticide stops bad flea beetle larvae in osr?
 

robs1

Member
We havent used any insecticide for ten years and gave up seed dressings two years before they were banned, not had more than a couple of very small patches of infection, YET, however I do wonder if not ploughing or min tilling helps the beneficials, I hope that is the case but thsts all it is, hope, I would sooner learn how to deal with aphids etc now as it won't be long before insecticides are all banned and half the time they dont work, hopefully resistant crops will help us
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
We havent used any insecticide for ten years and gave up seed dressings two years before they were banned, not had more than a couple of very small patches of infection, YET, however I do wonder if not ploughing or min tilling helps the beneficials, I hope that is the case but thsts all it is, hope, I would sooner learn how to deal with aphids etc now as it won't be long before insecticides are all banned and half the time they dont work, hopefully resistant crops will help us
Agree, the moaning about neonics is pointless. Resistance was building anyway. Canada now have big problems with flea beetle resistant to neonics
 

B'o'B

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Rutland
I do not think there is that much that the boffins have not been telling us for the last 40 years really. Cereals drilled in autumn will be at risk of virus vectors migrating into newly sown crops from summer host plants in the autumn until flights cease, dependent upon location around early November. Emerged crops are at risk in the period so treat with a suitable pyrethroid. Repeat if the prevailing conditions continue to pose a risk. Worst areas are coastal and southern counties.

You have all read it all before-unfortunate to get caught out do not think I am being unkind-but as agriculture may change, I do not think the natural world is forced to follow.

Social media warriors are often very unhelpful preaching about subjects like this-beneficials etc. Come October and weather turns I find most lacewings and ladybirds in the crevices of doors and windows, not foraging around my cereal crops. We had a field near a grass paddock caught about 10 years ago, should have treated again(in hindsight) as was a nild run into December. I did not consider it. Glad I gave it the first one though, as 8t/ha would have been worse! We are 3 miles south of the Humber. The same year a swathe north of Lincoln either side of the A15 was hit badly.

I am over 50-my thoughts may differ from younger members-I do not know
I’m a bit younger. I can remember maybe a couple of years spraying IPU+DFF+Topple10 at the 2 leaf stage in WW in my early years, but that’s about it. So while I know the theory, I have no practical knowledge except for a slowly increasing use of undressed seed and the last couple of years without Deter and getting away with not spraying, so I do feel that I still have a lot to learn about why I’ve got away without spraying the last few years and when I can reliably expect that approach to fail and actually need to spray.
 

B'o'B

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Rutland
How do organic growers get on with BYVD? Just accept it? Not suffer from it? or is it just less damaging as they expect lower yields? Although you do hear some very respectable yields from organic on individual crops.
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
How do organic growers get on with BYVD? Just accept it? Not suffer from it? or is it just less damaging as they expect lower yields? Although you do hear some very respectable yields from organic on individual crops.
Not as much of an issue from what I can gather from John Pawsey who I farm next to.
I think the way we slather on these powerful redidual herbicides instantly weakens the plants own immune system leaving it more open to attack from aphids (it’s to do with sugar levels). Large amounts of synthetic nitrogen also have a similar affect with pests but mostly diseases later on (and feeding the nitrogen junkie blackgrass!)
It does feel like we have farmed ourselves into a corner of our own making and whenever a new chemical comes along it just kicks the can of reality down the road for abit longer, obviously this doesn’t happen much anymore hence how agronomy and the way we think about growing crops is moving away from a singular focus on nitrogen and chemicals.
 

Clive

Staff Member
NFFN Member
Location
Lichfield
we saw it here in barley grown for first tine in a while - genuinely the first tine i’ve seen it for over a decade without seed dressing or insecticide

before rain it was looking bad but soon as it rained its all but disappeared, i expect it will clip yields but not dramatically


off the record im told 0.5L of zinc does a lot to help infections ? anyone ever tried or know more ?
 

Clive

Staff Member
NFFN Member
Location
Lichfield
Not as much of an issue from what I can gather from John Pawsey who I farm next to.
I think the way we slather on these powerful redidual herbicides instantly weakens the plants own immune system leaving it more open to attack from aphids (it’s to do with sugar levels). Large amounts of synthetic nitrogen also have a similar affect with pests but mostly diseases later on (and feeding the nitrogen junkie blackgrass!)
It does feel like we have farmed ourselves into a corner of our own making and whenever a new chemical comes along it just kicks the can of reality down the road for abit longer, obviously this doesn’t happen much anymore hence how agronomy and the way we think about growing crops is moving away from a singular focus on nitrogen and chemicals.

our barley had a autumn herbicide - autumn herbicide is unusual for us now

im becoming convinced there is a connection especially when you see the effect herbicides have on brixx level
 

Clive

Staff Member
NFFN Member
Location
Lichfield
I remember watching a bit on Countryfile a few months ago where a big arable farmer was saying how he hadn't used an insecticide for several years and that encouraging beneficials had negated the need. A couple of minutes later the same guy was saying that OSR hadn't been good and that he'd had to spray it all off. :scratchead: I did chuckle.
I know Roundup is cheap, but surely not as cheap as a well timed insecticide?

sadly CSFB don’t respect fence lines or farm boundaries

they are resistant to everything anyway pretty much so no loss not spraying or treating for them
 

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