Golden Nuggets....the 'fake meat' revolution is on its way....

ski

Member
Anthony Browne MP, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on the Environment writes in this week's Spectator, "Britain could be at the forefront of the revolution. We love animals: we are pragmatic about new technology". Further he writes "The FSA should now consider a fast - track approval process, and develop a strategy to deal with the many issues that arise from this global industrial revolution. The change in our diet seems inevitable, and it is always better to embrace the inevitable and shape it to your advantage, than try to resist it.

The article contains some real insight as to what we are up against, for instance, "There are strong arguments in favour of cultured meat. The most obvious is animal welfare. Like most of us I enjoy juicy steaks, crispy bacon and roast chicken, but I also love animals: around the world 80 billion animals are killed to eat each year" It would therefore appear to follow from a welfarist's perspective that no existence at all is better than an existence where death occurs prematurely and you are eaten. Death occurs to all living organisms, the logic that underlies this outlook is therefore no life is preferable to a short one, personally I'll take the short one if that is all that is on offer.

Here is what I think is the most important part "One research report forecast that by 2040, one third of all meat production in the world will be cultured - an industry opportunity worth billions of dollars". There we have it. It has nothing to do with welfare, large powerful corporations see the chance to make mega bucks and will sell the welfare story to steal our livelihoods.

AW
 
Anthony Browne MP, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on the Environment writes in this week's Spectator, "Britain could be at the forefront of the revolution. We love animals: we are pragmatic about new technology". Further he writes "The FSA should now consider a fast - track approval process, and develop a strategy to deal with the many issues that arise from this global industrial revolution. The change in our diet seems inevitable, and it is always better to embrace the inevitable and shape it to your advantage, than try to resist it.

The article contains some real insight as to what we are up against, for instance, "There are strong arguments in favour of cultured meat. The most obvious is animal welfare. Like most of us I enjoy juicy steaks, crispy bacon and roast chicken, but I also love animals: around the world 80 billion animals are killed to eat each year" It would therefore appear to follow from a welfarist's perspective that no existence at all is better than an existence where death occurs prematurely and you are eaten. Death occurs to all living organisms, the logic that underlies this outlook is therefore no life is preferable to a short one, personally I'll take the short one if that is all that is on offer.

Here is what I think is the most important part "One research report forecast that by 2040, one third of all meat production in the world will be cultured - an industry opportunity worth billions of dollars". There we have it. It has nothing to do with welfare, large powerful corporations see the chance to make mega bucks and will sell the welfare story to steal our livelihoods.

AW


The trouble is as i get older I see it more, for everything your told about doing the perceived "right" the more i see a whole load of negatives that seem to never get consideration.

Just one very small example. I've just checked my calving cows out field and there must have been a hundred swallows feeding frantically on flies swooping around everywhere.

When the cows are not in the field and the meat is grown in a lab what will the swallows eat then? Next thing you know there will be a cattle reintroduction scheme as the swallows have all but disappeared because there are no cattle to attract the flies................. and so it goes on.

They think they are doing right but are so blinkered they can't see the bigger picture, and the mentality is everywhere i look.
 
Last edited:

vantage

Member
Location
Pembs
Why do the song lyrics “ there’s a tumour in your humour” spring to mind? Don’t even know which song or artist/s.
Just googled , Robby Williams.
 
The trouble is as i get older I see it more, for everything your told about doing the perceived "right" the more i see a whole load of negatives that seem to never get consideration.

Just one very small example. I've just checked my calving cows out field and there must have been a hundred swallows feeding frantically on flies swooping around everywhere.

When the cows are not in the field and the meat is grown in a lab what will the swallows eat then? Next thing you know there will be a cattle reintroduction scheme as the swallows have all but disappeared because there are no cattle to attract the flies................. and so it goes on.

They think they are doing right but are so blinkered they can't see the bigger picture, and the mentality is everywhere i look.

Totally right!

I stopped keeping cattle for a couple of years, no swallows in the grassland at all. It was very evident what a beast brings to the table.... for swallows as well as us.
 
So we have a population of people who are being told to buy local and source decent product, made through artisan or traditional methods etc etc etc and magically they are all going to want to eat something vat grown in a laboratory? Ethical or not, I'm not sure I want to eat something that is 'manufactured' that way. I try my best to avoid processed carp as it is, I don't eat chicken nuggets or what-are-you-carcass meat products besides the odd pork pie. The idea of lab grown fungus is bad enough much less replacement mheat(TM)/phood(TM) you strain out of a vat into a bottle before it rapidly congeals like last night's gravy.
 
Just keep pushing the Soylent Green and "Frankenfood" connection, hopefully that will put enough people off buying and eating the factory swill... :mad:

Although, my daughter who is a confimed carnivore, insists on buying Quorn, which is shite, as she doesn't want to buy broiler chicken. I say fine, then buy from a smaller retailer or farm shop with provenance for the meat, much as @ollie989898 suggests.
 
Anthony Browne MP, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on the Environment writes in this week's Spectator, "Britain could be at the forefront of the revolution. We love animals: we are pragmatic about new technology". Further he writes "The FSA should now consider a fast - track approval process, and develop a strategy to deal with the many issues that arise from this global industrial revolution. The change in our diet seems inevitable, and it is always better to embrace the inevitable and shape it to your advantage, than try to resist it.

The article contains some real insight as to what we are up against, for instance, "There are strong arguments in favour of cultured meat. The most obvious is animal welfare. Like most of us I enjoy juicy steaks, crispy bacon and roast chicken, but I also love animals: around the world 80 billion animals are killed to eat each year" It would therefore appear to follow from a welfarist's perspective that no existence at all is better than an existence where death occurs prematurely and you are eaten. Death occurs to all living organisms, the logic that underlies this outlook is therefore no life is preferable to a short one, personally I'll take the short one if that is all that is on offer.

Here is what I think is the most important part "One research report forecast that by 2040, one third of all meat production in the world will be cultured - an industry opportunity worth billions of dollars". There we have it. It has nothing to do with welfare, large powerful corporations see the chance to make mega bucks and will sell the welfare story to steal our livelihoods.

AW
Britain could be at the forefront of the revolution.
We are already at the forefront of the European obesity stakes, if we try hard we herald the world race for diabetes and heart disease too! Or we could try to do something really radical, and build a food culture where we all cook and eat nutrient dense natural food that is not ultra processed and it's production looks after the natural environment at the same time!
 

melted welly

Member
Location
DD9.
We are already at the forefront of the European obesity stakes, if we try hard we herald the world race for diabetes and heart disease too! Or we could try to do something really radical, and build a food culture where we all cook and eat nutrient dense natural food that is not ultra processed and it's production looks after the natural environment at the same time!

Doesn’t suit the “business opportunity” though, coz the system already exists, it’s already efficient, in fact gone beyond and mostly dependent on subs, oft kept going by people working hours and in conditions general public wouldn’t or couldn’t.

so the wheel needs to be reinvented in order for investors and speculators to make money.

the focus is purely on cost, rather than value.
 

melted welly

Member
Location
DD9.
if we eat this lab produced meat substitute wheres the fat coming from for those perfect roast potatoes?
Some palm oil/nut concoction probably that tastes nothing like the real thing but they’ll just say it does in the adverts.

By the time folk realise, it’s already paid for so what does it matter if it gets binned?

Supermarkets been selling real food on that basis for years.
 

delilah

Member
I remember someone on here recently described lab grown meat as basically a tumour, which is essentially what it is.

We should all endeavour to describe it as such, at every opportunity. I can’t see the idea of eating something associated with that description being particularly appealing to anyone.

You can call it what you want, your mates at Tesco will drop you like a hot potato the minute it makes business sense for them to do so.
One supplier, straight from the factory to the store, no pesky middlemen, no whingeing farmers. Fake meat is the wet dream of supermarkets.

https://www.tescoplc.com/news/2020/tesco-commits-to-300-sales-increase-in-meat-alternatives/
 

johnspeehs

Member
Location
Co Antrim
You can call it what you want, your mates at Tesco will drop you like a hot potato the minute it makes business sense for them to do so.
One supplier, straight from the factory to the store, no pesky middlemen, no whingeing farmers. Fake meat is the wet dream of supermarkets.

https://www.tescoplc.com/news/2020/tesco-commits-to-300-sales-increase-in-meat-alternatives/

The question is do you think joe public will eat enough fake meat to let them hit their targets?. Im guessing a lot of people won't like the stuff and will hopefully return to local produce to get a decent eating experience. Basically there are very few things that we have left to enjoy, Eating good quality food for enjoyment is fairly high up my list rather than eating just to sustain my survival. Maybe the middle classes would like do their bit to save the planet even if it is misguided but I'm not sure the masses will follow. We also can't possibly know how this processed junk will affect us after eating it for 10 , 20 ,or 30 years, we have all saw what tinkering about in labs can lead to.
 

delilah

Member
The question is do you think joe public will eat enough fake meat to let them hit their targets?. Im guessing a lot of people won't like the stuff and will hopefully return to local produce

For the bulk of the UK population, local produce is something that happens in the cookery programmes. In real life they have little if any chance to buy local, given that they live in a food desert where the only 'choice' is which of the big 4 to drive to. The cartel have successfully eliminated local as they continually push towards fewer suppliers, just look at where they have managed to get the fruit and veg sector to, everything else is headed the same way. Moving from real food to fake food is simply a logical step for a business model that relies fundamentally on uniform supply of uniform product from one manufacturer.
 

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
So we have a population of people who are being told to buy local and source decent product, made through artisan or traditional methods etc etc etc and magically they are all going to want to eat something vat grown in a laboratory? Ethical or not, I'm not sure I want to eat something that is 'manufactured' that way. I try my best to avoid processed carp as it is, I don't eat chicken nuggets or what-are-you-carcass meat products besides the odd pork pie. The idea of lab grown fungus is bad enough much less replacement mheat(TM)/phood(TM) you strain out of a vat into a bottle before it rapidly congeals like last night's gravy.
I could tell u a story about pies that would put u off for life nj
 

Deranged peasant

Member
Arable Farmer
Even lab meat needs to eat, doesn’t grow out of thin air.
Anyway
It’s all about money, always is.
Sadly Browne is my MP, deluded Johnson shill, with Lib Dem’s snapping at his heels.
 

Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

  • 955
  • 0
Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
Top