grain store concrete panels

agcon1

Member
Location
derbyshire
converting hay barn to a grain store, floor will be laser levelled and power floated, question is, which is best....set panels up so they sit in the concrete, or lay floor and then sit them on top?.... pros and cons for each please
 

GrantMo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Moray
We did a Dutch barn in the summer, welded lugs to the stanchions for the panels to sit on, set the first run of panels on the lugs then concreted the floor. We set the panels level from front to back, so the bottom of them was 4” below finished level at the back of the shed and 1” below finished level at the front, then we gave the cement a 3” run from front to back (60 foot shed).

It gave the panels a good hold of the ground, a good seal for water as has been said already and most important I think is that it gives a nice edge for the bucket to run against when loading grain out of it...
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AA0D9225-05BC-4886-B760-D6EEAC98999D.jpeg
 

will_mck

Member
I'm building a grain shed in the new year and was thinking about using panels, I wonder how you close up the space when the side sheeting comes down to meet the panel if the panels are kept internally against the stanchion? I would want to keep small birds out of the shed. Is it a real hassle fitting the panels between or inside stanchions instead? Do the panels always have to be fitted at the same time as the stanchions going in when putting them in the H beam?
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
I'm building a grain shed in the new year and was thinking about using panels, I wonder how you close up the space when the side sheeting comes down to meet the panel if the panels are kept internally against the stanchion? I would want to keep small birds out of the shed. Is it a real hassle fitting the panels between or inside stanchions instead? Do the panels always have to be fitted at the same time as the stanchions going in when putting them in the H beam?
Mine are inside the stanchion, it makes the wall cladding simple, you just sheet down 12" below the top of the panels... nothing to fill in, and you get a shed 2 foot wider inside.

The hard bit is getting them in, they have to be cut accurately so you can put one end in and just get the other in before centralising, if your stantions are loose on the bolts it helps, a sheet of ply wood in the right place as they swing in also helps, you do end up with a nicer looking shed though.
 

Attachments

sanderrs030

Member
Mixed Farmer
converting hay barn to a grain store, floor will be laser levelled and power floated, question is, which is best....set panels up so they sit in the concrete, or lay floor and then sit them on top?.... pros and cons for each please
agcon1, I've a lot of nice examples from company Urbanist Architecture. Converting houses into flats article, when I saw it first time, seemed not so realistic, but after some real examples, I've seen in Croydon, and after getting some additional information about this firm, I've done it for myself as well.
 

Farmer_Joe

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
The North
We did a Dutch barn in the summer, welded lugs to the stanchions for the panels to sit on, set the first run of panels on the lugs then concreted the floor. We set the panels level from front to back, so the bottom of them was 4” below finished level at the back of the shed and 1” below finished level at the front, then we gave the cement a 3” run from front to back (60 foot shed).

It gave the panels a good hold of the ground, a good seal for water as has been said already and most important I think is that it gives a nice edge for the bucket to run against when loading grain out of it... View attachment 923205View attachment 923206View attachment 923207
how you get it dead flat with nothing to tamp off, i know you can get it close if you wet it up and go though it just wondered if you had any top tips.
 

GrantMo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Moray
how you get it dead flat with nothing to tamp off, i know you can get it close if you wet it up and go though it just wondered if you had any top tips.
Get the cement nice and wet for a start, then lead off the bulker with a loadall bucket so you can dump the concrete to exactly where you need it rather than the driver putting out a big slosh every few meters.
One person works a laser level staff, and a couple of men with rakes levelling as required. Then run from front to pack with a 6 meter power screed, leave it for a few hours then power float a few times. Far easier than buggering about with shuttering etc like we used to do!
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
how you get it dead flat with nothing to tamp off, i know you can get it close if you wet it up and go though it just wondered if you had any top tips.
My contractors order it wet (very important not to add water) and one is in charge of the chute instructing driver when to move, another rakes according to the man with laser level, its all looks very easy and un-rushed, remember to tie up the powerfloat at the back of the building to make a start as it goes off.
 

Farmer_Joe

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
The North
Get the cement nice and wet for a start, then lead off the bulker with a loadall bucket so you can dump the concrete to exactly where you need it rather than the driver putting out a big slosh every few meters.
One person works a laser level staff, and a couple of men with rakes levelling as required. Then run from front to pack with a 6 meter power screed, leave it for a few hours then power float a few times. Far easier than buggering about with shuttering etc like we used to do!
i have to say used loadall last time and just added last bit of shutter at front or shed at the end, as you say i got the concrete where it was needed and made the job much easier load less moving it about with rakes.

i cold reach over a large section with wood to check it was ok and borrowed a home made tamp tool (5 ft plasters rake with handle welded on) which we walked though with working the concrete, this got air out and i have to sat make it dam flat.

Floated it off with an 8ft long reach float which worlked well im not flash enough for a power float.

ive got another 30ft square to do in shed but there is no where to tamp from but im less fussy about this bit being perfect as its just for machinery storage.

how long did you leave it before going on with vibrating tamp?
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
i have to say used loadall last time and just added last bit of shutter at front or shed at the end, as you say i got the concrete where it was needed and made the job much easier load less moving it about with rakes.

i cold reach over a large section with wood to check it was ok and borrowed a home made tamp tool (5 ft plasters rake with handle welded on) which we walked though with working the concrete, this got air out and i have to sat make it dam flat.

Floated it off with an 8ft long reach float which worlked well im not flash enough for a power float.

ive got another 30ft square to do in shed but there is no where to tamp from but im less fussy about this bit being perfect as its just for machinery storage.

how long did you leave it before going on with vibrating tamp?
You dont need the tamp with the correct mix, just easyfloats, and to be really smooth hire a powerfloat.
 

Forever Fendt

Member
Location
Derbyshire
I'm building a grain shed in the new year and was thinking about using panels, I wonder how you close up the space when the side sheeting comes down to meet the panel if the panels are kept internally against the stanchion? I would want to keep small birds out of the shed. Is it a real hassle fitting the panels between or inside stanchions instead? Do the panels always have to be fitted at the same time as the stanchions going in when putting them in the H beam?
spill flashing
 

GrantMo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Moray
Every time we emptied a load we pulled the power screed over it. They float over it no problem, and it wasn’t expensive to hire from GAP for the day.
We then left it about 3 hours before going on with the polisher, that was a hot day in the summer though it would need a bit longer at this time of year. Do the polishing with slippers or crocs to save making imprints on the surface which you then need to polish out!
 

Robert K

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex
I'm building a grain shed in the new year and was thinking about using panels, I wonder how you close up the space when the side sheeting comes down to meet the panel if the panels are kept internally against the stanchion? I would want to keep small birds out of the shed. Is it a real hassle fitting the panels between or inside stanchions instead? Do the panels always have to be fitted at the same time as the stanchions going in when putting them in the H beam?
Ideally the panels want to be smooth internally so fixing them against the stanchion is best

Along the top edge they will fit a spill flashing
 

Attachments

RAF

Member
Location
staffs
Got a hay barn with 20 ft bays with 6 inch panels . Two high . Thinking of concreting this for grain will the panels be strong enough ?
thanks
 

RAF

Member
Location
staffs
10 year old shed .12 inch legs but bolted in . Wonder weather to put rsj in middle and then be able go 3 high .
 

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NFU Scotland looks to find the next climate friendly farming champion

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Written by William Kellett

NFU Scotland has started the search for Scotland’s climate friendly farming champion.

Hosted by NFU Scotland’s Next Generation group and supported by Royal Bank of Scotland, the competition is encouraging Scotland’s farmers and crofters to take to video to outline the steps they are taking to reduce emissions and deliver wider environmental benefits.

The panel of judges will now include Ben Macpherson MSP, newly appointed Minister for Rural Affairs and the Natural Environment; Claire Taylor, political affairs editor at the Scottish Farmer; and NFU Scotland’s Next Generation Chair Peter Moss.

Those entering NFU Scotland’s competition will have a chance to win a...
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