Have the dealers realised

Beefsmith

Member
That things are changing?
Ive been looking at telehandlers and found one in as new condition with low hours but 14 months old. I enquired with the dealer and the price was £72,500 which is about £12,000 less than a new price today so a reasonable discount I thought. In the meantime a fellow tff member directed me to a farm who had a machine for sale but hadn’t advertised it as they weren’t 100% sure about selling it. Basically they bought it new but unseen and it’s not quite big enough for there job but liveable with. In an ideal world they’d change it so they’d had it valued by the same dealer I’d been in touch with by coincidence.
The dealer had offered them £44,500 so discounting it by £40,000 after only 14 months use. They’d then advertised it without the farmers consent with a £28,000 potential profit margin in it for themselves even using the pictures they’d taken in the farms yard when it was valued.
So they’ve been caught out and upon questioning them on this the salesman’s reply was that all staff had been instructed to maximise profits because if they don’t there won’t be any job within a year due to the fast approaching downturn in machinery sales. He was very apologetic and embarrassed. I then sent a letter of complaint to the dealer principle who called me up and basically said the same thing.
I’ve bought said machine direct off the farm so we’ve cut the ‘stealer’ out of the equation.
 

Beefsmith

Member
Sounds like they were trying to rip off someone big time. Should name and shame really and would be nice if we had a farmer version of watchdog for those kind of 'dealers'!

I’ve told my local dealer about it and asked them to tell the manufacturer but I suspect they won’t as they’ll all be in the same boat moving forward. This corona virus is about to ruin the machinery trade if you ask me. Very tough times ahead for all the supply trades I think.
 

Johnnyboxer

Member
Location
Yorkshire
That things are changing?
Ive been looking at telehandlers and found one in as new condition with low hours but 14 months old. I enquired with the dealer and the price was £72,500 which is about £12,000 less than a new price today so a reasonable discount I thought. In the meantime a fellow tff member directed me to a farm who had a machine for sale but hadn’t advertised it as they weren’t 100% sure about selling it. Basically they bought it new but unseen and it’s not quite big enough for there job but liveable with. In an ideal world they’d change it so they’d had it valued by the same dealer I’d been in touch with by coincidence.
The dealer had offered them £44,500 so discounting it by £40,000 after only 14 months use. They’d then advertised it without the farmers consent with a £28,000 potential profit margin in it for themselves even using the pictures they’d taken in the farms yard when it was valued.
So they’ve been caught out and upon questioning them on this the salesman’s reply was that all staff had been instructed to maximise profits because if they don’t there won’t be any job within a year due to the fast approaching downturn in machinery sales. He was very apologetic and embarrassed. I then sent a letter of complaint to the dealer principle who called me up and basically said the same thing.
I’ve bought said machine direct off the farm so we’ve cut the ‘stealer’ out of the equation.

I see this more and more

Good on you
 

Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Most of machinery manufacturing has stopped due to social distancing. They'll have 8 weeks of production they are behind. Farmers and dealers have continued as normal. So orders being taken.

I've been looking at buying a new loader tractor. Be September delivery at earliest on a new build. Which points to full order book.
 

Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
That things are changing?
Ive been looking at telehandlers and found one in as new condition with low hours but 14 months old. I enquired with the dealer and the price was £72,500 which is about £12,000 less than a new price today so a reasonable discount I thought. In the meantime a fellow tff member directed me to a farm who had a machine for sale but hadn’t advertised it as they weren’t 100% sure about selling it. Basically they bought it new but unseen and it’s not quite big enough for there job but liveable with. In an ideal world they’d change it so they’d had it valued by the same dealer I’d been in touch with by coincidence.
The dealer had offered them £44,500 so discounting it by £40,000 after only 14 months use. They’d then advertised it without the farmers consent with a £28,000 potential profit margin in it for themselves even using the pictures they’d taken in the farms yard when it was valued.
So they’ve been caught out and upon questioning them on this the salesman’s reply was that all staff had been instructed to maximise profits because if they don’t there won’t be any job within a year due to the fast approaching downturn in machinery sales. He was very apologetic and embarrassed. I then sent a letter of complaint to the dealer principle who called me up and basically said the same thing.
I’ve bought said machine direct off the farm so we’ve cut the ‘stealer’ out of the equation.
You sound like a right sh!t stirrer. What business of yours is it how much profit the dealer makes on it? It's up to the farmer how much he sells it back to dealer for,and how much they charge for it? It's only worth what somebody's willing to pay for it.
 

Johnnyboxer

Member
Location
Yorkshire
You sound like a right sh!t stirrer.

What business of yours is it how much profit the dealer makes on it?

It's up to the farmer how much he sells it back to dealer for,and how much they charge for it?

It's only worth what somebody's willing to pay for it.

That was achieved when Beefsmith, who paid a few £1000 less than the dealer's advertised price and a lot more than what said dealer, offered his original customer to buy it back in................ for resale

Happy farmer buyer and even happier farmer seller

Case closed
 
You sound like a right sh!t stirrer. What business of yours is it how much profit the dealer makes on it? It's up to the farmer how much he sells it back to dealer for,and how much they charge for it? It's only worth what somebody's willing to pay for it.
Oh I don’t know, it does sound like they were trying to take a rather excessive margin out of a machine they didn’t own.
 
That’s pure greed on the dealers part and serves em right.i can see machinery dealers closing with the astronomical and ridiculous prices they are seeking for machinery these days.
Nick...

It may be classed as greed by some or even many but it is of no consequence what profit or margin others make- no one is obliged to deal with them. This is the free market unfortunately, there is no quango controlling the price of new or used farm equipment. If farmers collectively stopped buying new stuff and explained that it was all too expensive then manufacturers would probable cease charging so much or building such expensive machines in the first place.
 
Wow, what a shocker - dealer tries to make a big profit from farm machinery.
Don't see what the issue is, even if they were trying to make a quick profit of 28 grand or 28 quid, no one forced the farmer to sell his machine at the agreed price and no one was forcing the potential buyer into paying what they (the dealer) were asking. Bet the same farmer wouldn't have the same view of fairness if they heard of a man desperate to buy straw and would pay well over the odds and also knew someone with straw for sale that was desperate for money, bet they'd think it was a good opportunity to make a quick pound or two acting as a middle man.
 
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Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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