How big a slatted shed for 150 suckler cows?

Discussion in 'Buildings & Infrastructure' started by marco, Mar 11, 2017.

  1. Hilly

    Hilly Member

    Location:
    Scottish Borders.
    AH i see .
     
  2. Mrs Brown

    Mrs Brown Member

    Location:
    Orkney Islands
    Saw a builder do it on mainland Orkney just placed shuttering between the beams held up by acro props was a lot of faffing about cutting ply to fit, dare say a builder who does a few buildings would have shutter to fit.
     
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  3. willie waver

    willie waver Member

    Location:
    walking in the ayr
    plenty of high level slatted sheds built in the 70's with brick around here. built into the side of a hill, passage way at top, sleepers for the slurry doors at the bottom. and mucked out into a dung spreader which saved spending a fortune on slurry equipment. as sheepwise said, you'd need an effluent tank now, but cant see how it wouldn't work fine
     
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  4. james ds

    james ds Member

    Location:
    leinster
    Was that David clarkes. If so it's some shed.
     
  5. You can get various different ratings, from 1 tonne axel weight up to about 8/10 tonne i think :)
     
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  6. Dave6170

    Dave6170 Member

    Location:
    Wick, caithness
    Was talking to another farmer up here who converted a bedded shed to cubicles, took a winter and a half to pay for the cubicles from straw savings.
     
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  7. Hilly

    Hilly Member

    Location:
    Scottish Borders.
    Im wondering if i could design a door that sealed, would only need open once if the pit was big enough, then no need for a tank.
     
  8. S J H

    S J H Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    If you had a ramp down into it then I wonder if you'll have enough volume for the effluent
     
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  9. Hilly

    Hilly Member

    Location:
    Scottish Borders.
    Ramp would collect rain water tho !, im now thinking have a eff tank and use a weeping wall for the door, with land drain pipe up the sides like a silage pit, mean the poop would be nice to spread, be like cream cheese !
     
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  10. S J H

    S J H Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    Have the ramp internal after your sealed door. (y)
     
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  11. Hilly

    Hilly Member

    Location:
    Scottish Borders.
    Good idea would just have to be carefull of height for loader but it wont need 12` at the door. i think i could get almost the perfect design out of you chaps.
     
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  12. james ds

    james ds Member

    Location:
    leinster
    A ramped tank is a waste of time , there were a lot of them here years ago but they are now all gone and converted to slatted tanks , emptying a ramped tank would cost a fortune compared to a slatted tank .
     
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  13. james ds

    james ds Member

    Location:
    leinster
    Another problem with a tank that you could drive down into would be that it would be very sheltered and there could be dangerous gas in it , I for one would never go into it .
     
  14. sheepwise

    sheepwise Member

    Location:
    SW Scotland
    Contractors spread 2/3 of our 100' x 60' x 8' tank in February with umbilical in 1 day over approx 70 acres.Total cost £890 + 420Litres of diesel.Would have been a week with dungspreader and forklift and the pleasure of driving in below slats with cattle still on top!!!
     
    marco likes this.
  15. Bossfarmer

    Bossfarmer Member

    Location:
    central Scotland
    why is it that fattening doesn't pay in your area?
     
  16. scholland

    scholland Member

    Location:
    ze3
    @Hilly the sac farm at Edinburgh had (might still be there) a slatted cattle shed with doors and you went in with the handler to dig it out. The doors seeped a bit but most of the pee was in there still, it was grim. It possibly could be made to work but by the time you have built an effluent tank etc it will be dearer than a slurry tank. Suspended feed pass made with precast slabs are a lot easier and give you heaps of storage.
    A tidal wave of pee heading for the door under slats isn't for me!
     
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  17. Half Pipe

    Half Pipe Member

    there can be quite a bit of pressure on sleepers we use to shut up end of our high level slats, just lift 1 out at a time with bucket, then take a couple of scoops, before taking next 1 out.
    I don't fancy opening a door in 1 go, even fairly 'dry' dung from slat moves.
    we have a high level shed and a slurry tank shed at each farm, liquid from high level gets pumped to slurry to help mix it.
    would think most suckler cow diets will produce dung that needs liquid.
    high level sheds need a bit of thought about how its stocked,
    ie you don't want a few or smaller cattle in pen furthest from muck out end as be less dung which leaves a pocket for water to gather. A decent sized and shaped bucket with a west dual style spreader not Long shifting alot
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2017
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  18. Hilly

    Hilly Member

    Location:
    Scottish Borders.
    Because im a hill farmer cant grow barley everything would have to be bought in, and price of stores its a no brainer just to have more cows, my immediate area is predominantly sheep, further inby like 10 miles down hill alot do fatten.
     
    Dave6170 likes this.
  19. Bossfarmer

    Bossfarmer Member

    Location:
    central Scotland
    the price of feed barley the last 5 years I wouldn't have thought there would be much difference?
     
  20. Hilly

    Hilly Member

    Location:
    Scottish Borders.
    Probs cheaper buying it ! but i also don`t have shed capacity and don`t like fattening them, when you see the price of stores i cant see much in it for myself especially if i had to build another shed or rent grazing , also don`t even like fattening cattle i like producing stores, fattend them up till reference years then stopped built up another 100 cows and hopefully never have to fatten cattle again but you never know.
     

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