How to dock an older lambs tail

Obi Wan

Member
Location
Argyll
I've two older lambs that I'm looking as selling on for breeding, they missed having their tails docked as the main flock started lambing sooner than expected. There about 3-4 months old now. What's the routine? Vet job or will they just whinge and say leave alone :facepalm:
 

MRT

Member
I've two older lambs that I'm looking as selling on for breeding, they missed having their tails docked as the main flock started lambing sooner than expected. There about 3-4 months old now. What's the routine? Vet job or will they just whinge and say leave alone :facepalm:
I would ask your vet yes. They may whinge
 

Obi Wan

Member
Location
Argyll
Probably end up leaving them, back in the good old days this wouldn't be seen as a problem but nosey townie neighbours hiding here in their second home are a royal pain in a##e :arghh:
 

egbert

Member
Long ago, when the world was young, I was lucky enough to have sat drinking cider (or very possibly zyder) with an old fella locally - 'mutton chop' side burns, bowler hat, the works
....now long gone sadly.
Amidst the pearls of wisdom was how to cut off lambs tails

You do em with a sharp knife when they'm several weeks.
They'm best when they'm doin real well, and fat as butter.
Don't ee upset um, cuz they'll bleed too much else.
Juzz pen em up with their muthars close by the chopping block (and i'm sure he said knife rather than axe), and speak quiet to em, find a joint tween thar bones... and there tiz.
An then you kin ave lambs tail pie fer tea...bootie!

He went on to describe curing constipation in bullocks- a process involving a handful of lard-, various other animal husbandry techniques
....and ever mindful to impart good advice to a rapt youngster.....what to do with a sore finger. (All together now...'you put it in zyder')

As far as the OP? Leave em on now.
I got plenty of long tail ewes, and see it as sign they jumped up and ran before Basil or I could get near em. a good sign!
 
Long ago, when the world was young, I was lucky enough to have sat drinking cider (or very possibly zyder) with an old fella locally - 'mutton chop' side burns, bowler hat, the works
....now long gone sadly.
Amidst the pearls of wisdom was how to cut off lambs tails

You do em with a sharp knife when they'm several weeks.
They'm best when they'm doin real well, and fat as butter.
Don't ee upset um, cuz they'll bleed too much else.
Juzz pen em up with their muthars close by the chopping block (and i'm sure he said knife rather than axe), and speak quiet to em, find a joint tween thar bones... and there tiz.
An then you kin ave lambs tail pie fer tea...bootie!

He went on to describe curing constipation in bullocks- a process involving a handful of lard-, various other animal husbandry techniques
....and ever mindful to impart good advice to a rapt youngster.....what to do with a sore finger. (All together now...'you put it in zyder')

As far as the OP? Leave em on now.
I got plenty of long tail ewes, and see it as sign they jumped up and ran before Basil or I could get near em. a good sign!
At Newton Rigg college in the nineties we were taught how to screw the tail off in your hands. Lambs never flinched or bled,I thought it was brilliant. I tried showing Dad at home one weekend and our lambs were a lot older. It didn't go well......never tried since.
 
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Obi Wan

Member
Location
Argyll
Cheers folks, enjoyed the stories of old and the comment about what's legal In NZ but won't be stated on the Tesco label (y)Will try and catch the vet soon.

Was always a knife here on a dry day, pile of ewes tails to the right, wedders to the left, the grandfather would count them out at the end. Never seemed to bother them.
 
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Tim W

Member
Location
Wiltshire
Was always a knife here on a dry day, pile of ewes tails to the right, wedders to the left, the grandfather would count them out at the end. Never seemed to bother them.
And it may not ''bother'' them but to a certain extent that is irrelevant
What is certainly relevant are market demands and many countries in EU (which presently takes 50% of our lamb) do not allow docking or castration, i would like to retain access to that market
If i was a farmer in EU i would be asking for parity of standards for imports (just like we want from NZ) ] in the coming trade negotiations over Brexit

We don't always get want we want of course but there is no harm in asking and positive advantages to being ahead of the game in market demands
 

Jockers84

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Caithness
I hear you man ? the posts above are obviously stories of the PAST, or for the explanation to any hyper sensitive animal welfare types DOESN’T HAPPEN ANYMORE.
I ain’t no rebel or renegade, both the welfare of my animals, and free market access are paramount imho.
The OP was a serious and hopefully constructive question on how you would A. approach such a problem, and B. maybe then glean the costings from someone that’s been through said experience.
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
Just out of curiosity,how common is mulesing ( might be spelt wrong ) in NZ and Australia now? Makes a rubber ring look pretty tame

It's been banned in NZ since 01 October 2018. Still used in Australia, but there are alternatives such as breeding wrinkle free merions and using a technique similar to freeze branding.

About a year ago I had lunch with an Australian wool farmer. She bred away from mulesing 20 years ago, and is now looking for an alternative to live export for her slaughter merino wethers.
 

egbert

Member
It's been banned in NZ since 01 October 2018. Still used in Australia, but there are alternatives such as breeding wrinkle free merions and using a technique similar to freeze branding.

About a year ago I had lunch with an Australian wool farmer. She bred away from mulesing 20 years ago, and is now looking for an alternative to live export for her slaughter merino wethers.
Cousin-in-law o mine was over 4-5 years past. He's a grain farmer first, and admits it- but had started keeping a few (hundred) sheep when corn was a dead loss.
He is told by some boffin somewhere which rams to put to which ewes, to breed in various traits.
And maggot resistance was one of em i recall. He reckoned they were getting almost no problems with strike, just from genetic selection.
(This is NSW, inland from coast range.)
It sounded very impressive - although a candid report might suggest he's a lovely guy, but is always one to tell you all his geese are swans- as it were.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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