Indoor lambing set up costs

Andy84

Member
I know it’s a pretty expansive question but how many lambs do you think you save lambing a cheviot flock inside v outside. Trying to work out how long it would take to pay off the extra costs for lambing inside (eg gates, hurdles, feeders etc)
 

HarryB97

Member
As above change the breed not the setup. Indoors is generally a waste of time even if you are lambing early as most years the price is no where as good as this year. All the bedding, cake, silage, pens, labour, disease, penning sheep up & trailering them all back outside again.
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
I know it’s a pretty expansive question but how many lambs do you think you save lambing a cheviot flock inside v outside. Trying to work out how long it would take to pay off the extra costs for lambing inside (eg gates, hurdles, feeders etc)

How many more do you think you could possibly save?

You'll save the odd hung lamb or one still in the bag - if you're there as it happens... but there will still be the odd lamb born dead.


You'll not (shouldn't) lose any to bad weather.. but chevs should can handle bad weather - depending on what the lambs are, ofcourse


It could be argued that what you'd save to the weather inside, you could more than lose to bacterial diseases like Watery Mouth if you get into a problem
 
As above change the breed not the setup. Indoors is generally a waste of time even if you are lambing early as most years the price is no where as good as this year. All the bedding, cake, silage, pens, labour, disease, penning sheep up & trailering them all back outside again.
Nobody ever factors in the effect if everyone went to this outdoor easycare system and all the lambs came into the market at the same time. Some of us are on wet, late grass farms where outdoor lambing doesn’t work that well. I think you can manipulate stocking rates in your favour slightly with indoor lambing on smaller farms. but it obviously comes with costs.
 

Mc115reed

Member
Iv nothing too hide so I’ll post all my costs exactly...

270 ewes too lamb.. inside from the 14th of jan and lambing started 24th jan all lambed and turned out by 20th of March
Scanned 162%
18 Triplets ate £103 of corn
126 singles ate £325 of corn
126 twins ate £1086 of corn
I used 24 120x90x7ft bales of hay I’d imagine they’ll be £60 a piece but not had the bill yet so £1560
15 120x90x8ft bales of hay again not had the bill yet but probably £60 a bale so £900
A girl helped me for 3 weeks 8hours a day 4 days a week and cost £1400
The value of my hurdles is £1400
The value of my walk through feeders is £560
£70 on hydrated lime
Shed rent was £1000 for 2 months start to finish
Cost me £300 get somebody come with a bob cat muck it out at the end
I spent £600 on drugs treating bad feed and bad lambings ect...
spent £150 on water pipe fittings, and pipes and a few second hand troughs
Can’t find anything else Iv wrote down as costs so that must be it So in total it cost me too lamb inside this year (I already had hurdles and walkthrough troughs but includes there value for if I had too go out and buy them fresh)

£9450 all in but... it was nearly a foot of snow for the whole first week of lambing, and I doubt nc mules and suffolk crosses would lamb outside that early without plenty of pain... also my land is scattered all over the place...
 

S J H

Member
Location
Bedfordshire
Nobody ever factors in the effect if everyone went to this outdoor easycare system and all the lambs came into the market at the same time. Some of us are on wet, late grass farms where outdoor lambing doesn’t work that well. I think you can manipulate stocking rates in your favour slightly with indoor lambing on smaller farms. but it obviously comes with costs.
We’d just have more hoggs to sell for a longer season.
 

Optimus

Member
Glad mine are inside.-5 here this morning and it was snowing last night.hope anything lambing outside during the night.was on its feet quick an suckling.
 

aled1590

Member
Location
N.wales
Supppse it also depends what else you have going on. We lamb inside here and also calve our sucklers mid March onwards. Being able to pop in on a cow mid calving whilst doing jobs in lambing shed is handy. If I was lambing outside I could be 15-20 minutes away sorting problems out in the field. Also our fields would be a complete mud bath if it had to carry ewes on before lambing unless I would bring them in before lambing and back out again just before starting.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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