Lambing behind electric fence

Discussion in 'Livestock & Forage' started by jemski, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. jemski

    jemski Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    I will be lambing my Cheviots behind electric fencing on 2 sides. I had ideas of recording them all at lambing but they are a bit wild so I think better to leave them too it as much as possible. Will they be ok behind electric? Do lambs ever wander off and get stuck the wrong side or do they generally lamb away from it? Do i need 4 strands or will 3 be ok?
     
  2. Jerry

    Jerry Member

    Location:
    Devon
    I put ewes and lambs behind 3 strand electric from a couple days old and don't have a problem.
     
  3. Wink

    Wink Member

    I don't lamb many ewes but lambed them all outside behind 3 strands of electric last year, left them too it, no problems!
     
    Man_in_black likes this.
  4. Nearly all mine behind 3 strand last year. Never had one get stuck. All get a shock first day they bold enough to leave mum.
     
    Wink likes this.
  5. slaney

    slaney Member

    Lambed ewes on one side of a field divided by three strands and then moved them to the other side as they lambed. Never had a problem.

    Keep the electric lowish pregnant ewes less likely to jump it
     
  6. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    When Ridley RAPPA fencing first came out, we made up paddocks in the field next to the building (on mains fencer) with 3 strands, where we put ewes and lambs for a few days after they were mothered up in the individual pens. That meant we had groups on either side of electric fencing. Wear no end of young lambs that wandered under the wire to get to a bleating ewe on the other side and those lambs never forgot the trick. They soon learnt that, if you put your head down and run under, you don't get much of a shock, if any.
    The result was that those sheep would never reliably stay behind RAPPA fencing for the rest of their lives. That was when we changed over to electric netting, which stopped the problem. After those original sheep had gone through the system, I could use stranded fences for the older sheep when needed, but personally, I would never use it for young lambs again, ever.

    I now lamb outside, in larger fields that have stock netting fences, so not an issue, but if I was going back to lambing behind electric, it would be netting.
     
  7. Tim W

    Tim W Member

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    I lamb behind 3 strands no worries , done it for years
    I had a few problems last year for the first time because I let a battery go dead for a few days and the little sods got a bad escaping habit, but I then put a 4th bottom earth wire along the stretch they were escaping from and this stopped all problems

    80% of my sheep are behind electric fences from day 1 right through their lives .... like anything if you do it right it will work well
     
  8. What I have picked up (and I think @neilo would agree) is that they should be ok with sheep on one side of the electric but you want to avoid having them on both sides.

    I used two strands to fence off a little bit of wood at lambing last year with no issues.
     

  9. +1. All but one of my locations are solely electric. Was very apprehensive at first but they soon learn so long as the first shock (and every shock) is a big one. I rotate 3 battery's for each energizer, always have 2 on charge and never ever let one die.

    Only escapees I had last year were from a gap in stock fence!!
     
  10. jemski

    jemski Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    Brilliant thanks everyone. @neilo each fenced area is surrounded by woods/hedges so no sheep will be next to each other so hopefully will be ok! Need to invest in some more batteries though I think. I have a few but they aren't great. Had 2 good leisure batteries but one got nicked and I dropped the other off the quad and it smashed
     
    neilo likes this.
  11. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    I have seven 96Ah batteries, all bought new 5 years ago and not leisure batteries and 6 fencers, which can all be on the go in the winter. I keep one on charge and cycle the others, so no batteries go flat.
     
    Man_in_black likes this.
  12. jemski

    jemski Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    Where's the best place to get them?
     
  13. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    I just got them from local motor factors, but Wynnstay have them on the shelf too. Pretty standard small tractor battery.

    The last battery I bought (for the Merlo) came from https://www.tayna.co.uk/
     
  14. David.

    David. Member

    Location:
    J11 M40
    I have just bought 85a leisure battery for £50 and 110a for £65, have to say the 110a look the better value.
    Local motor factors.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  15. hindmaist

    hindmaist Member

    Anyone got tips for how to make little "mothering up" paddocks of ,say, half an acre? It would be good to be able to shift them onto clean ground every few days so something quick and easy is essential.
     
  16. Coximus

    Coximus Member

    4 strands us what I've been told with the extra one 3 incessant from he ground. Even the rabbits get a shock, will be trying it this year, apparently if the lambs learn young they have strong fence respect - ut holds true to some ewes I brought in this year - they won't even go thru an old broken down half fence between 2 fields, (treated as 1) but go to the gap where the gate used to even tho the rest of yhe flock walks thru the hedge and fence line
     
  17. Wooly

    Wooly Member

    Location:
    Romney Marsh
    We tend to lamb behind 2 strands of electric fence on turnips if its dry enough.

    The lambs just appear to accept the ewes will go off and eat each day the fence is moved. (As per picture 1)

    Second picture is lambing on two sides of the turnips, just before they reached the end. It appeared to work except for one lamb who slept in the middle and became the 'slumdog lamb', as we never knew where it belonged. IMG_0089.JPG DSC00282.JPG
     
    Al R and unlacedgecko like this.
  18. Wink

    Wink Member

    Can also try your local scrap yard if you need a number of them? Should be able to pick up 3 for about £50 - never had any problems with them unless I have run them to empty by mistake (mistake learnt quickly). Just change them religiously. I change mine every week or two (and check them with a tester every week) and they seem to do the job well and last.
     
  19. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    I've never understood the idea of buying batteries from a scrappy. I only ever chuck batteries if they won't hold charge. If they won't hold charge, they certainly aren't much use for a fencer, IME. As a stock farmer, I consider keeping sheep trained to an electric fence more important than not using jump leads on my tractor.
    2J fencers are a minimum and I need to know they are working.

    Anyone that gets one of my old batteries from the scrappy, certainly won't be keeping sheep in for long.
     
    Man_in_black, David. and Tim W like this.
  20. Wink

    Wink Member

    Maybe varies from yard to yard? I have been happy with the ones I have bought - come fully charged and last up to 3 weeks before being needed to recharge but I change every 1-2 weeks. Obviously depends how many acres your fencing and I would presume your doing a vastly larger area than I am at a time? Not talking about pulling knackered batteries out of the old trucks etc. or someone's discards, I mean off the shelf types that the yard had checked. Any problems you just take them straight back but never had a problem with them (stock don't get out - pigs and sheep and they hold their charge). A scrap yard shouldn't be selling someones worn out battery. I have leisure batteries too and find no difference between them other than the leisure can be run flat?
     
    neilo likes this.

Share This Page