MF tractor in flood water

AUMF

Member
Hello, couldn't get one of our tractors out before flooding. Water has gone in engine. What is the best way to flush it and clean it out? Thanks in advance.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Take the injectors out before even trying to turn the engine. I hope you haven't or you will probably have bent conrods.
Assuming everything is OK, then turn the engine over two revolutions by hand to eject the bulk of water out of the injector holes before finally spinning it on the starter. Change the oil and filter and refit the injectors and away you go. Check the transmission and front axle for water pollution after a quick spin around the yard and drain and refill if necessary.
 

Mur Huwcun

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North West Wales
How much water? Right over? Any gone in fuel tank?

Injectors or glowplugs out and try spinning it over to see if any water comes out of cylinders. water in cylinders won’t compress and will damadge something like the conrods if it’s just started. If any water comes out just let the cylinders empty and re fit injectors or glowplugs.

Tyen it’s a matter of changing all fluids and filters. Better still if you have another tractor change fluids in that one and use the old oils to flush the flooded one before changing for new oils
 

agrimax

Member
Location
Co Down
Drain the oil and remove the filter first. No point cranking the engine and mixing the oil and water and having watery oil sticking to everything. The water will run out of the drain hole first anyway,provided it hasn't been mixed. Did the air filter escape the water,and the battery?If water got in the engine,it'll likely be in the back end too...
What model?
 

Timbo

Member
Location
Gods County
Any part that holds oil drain it.

Any electrical connectors that got wet, part them and inspect pins & clean.

Injectors out, intercooler off if it has one, inspect for water anywhere it shouldnt be.

Cross your fingers! Depends exactly what tractor and how deep it was too.
 
Last edited:

box

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
NZ
What model MF? Going off your previous posts, it's either a 1085 or a 7475?.....I hope for your sake it's the old girl that drowned.

Hope we see some of that rain, due to get here tomorrow with a bit of luck. (I assume you're in AU based on your username)
 

AUMF

Member
Hi it's a 168 but have a disused 50b to clean up as well. Up to the top of engine. On the food plain just outside Sydney. First time over the farm since 91. But when family started farming 1960, Dad said 14 over the farm in 14 years. Produce prices as we all know were much higher relatively and land cheap so it was easier to bounce back in those days. Growing veges and turf
 

agrimax

Member
Location
Co Down
Ok...So the engine oil will need drained and changed and the filter. The power steering reservoir drained and filter changed with new oil.Water will have went through the breather. Air filter might have escaped and the fuel tank should be ok if it wasn't totally submerged. Gearbox and rear end oil out and filter washed and fresh oil. If you could drain and refill etc before moving it,it would prevent the water from mixing with oil. The bulk of the water will run out of the drain holes first anyway. Battery is likely kaput too.
If the water was right over the engine,I'd think it will have went in the exhaust and likely the intake,so it'll be injectors out...
Starter might need drying out too and the key switch.
 
Have you drained anything?
If you leave water in crankcase the more likely corrosion will start
If it happened to my tractor I would seriously consider a complete engine
Dismantle
 

Wisconsonian

Member
Trade
It's usually muddy water, so anywhere there's a lot of water, I'd drain all the oil and flush with a garden hose before refilling and starting. Check the engine and transmission by loosening the drain bolt enough to let it drip to see if it's oil or water at the bottom. Probably not that lucky if it got to the top of the engine. Hose off all the mud on the outside, including inside the alternator, and starter. Don't forget the radiator, easier to rinse the mud off before it dries too hard.

Get it drained and started soon, it gets worse fast.
 
We had a tractor go under in floods years ago, pop injectors after water and oil is drained from the engine, crank slowly get all the water out of the cylinders then fill each cylinder with a little diesel and repeat process then completely fill the engine with diesel and let it drain after this has been done slap on all new oil and fuel filters and you should be fine thats what we did and the tractor ran fine for years
 

AUMF

Member
Thanks for the info. I have cleaned the engine up and got it going well.

I removed the triangular filter cover under the transmission and removed the strainer/filter. Did it yesterday and bought a new strainer today. Only problem I forgot how it came apart. The strainer sits 3/4 in a bowl but is the bowl secured upside down with the bottom 1/4 of the strainer hanging out from the bottom of the bowl? Also there is a rubber washer. Not sure if this goes in the bowl or outside the bowl.

From the top down I see rubber washer, then bowl upside down then strainer in bowl and bolted from the bottom and finally a wire insert in the bolt. Please advice. Thanks
 
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Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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