New variant covid

Mek

Member
People travel should have been stopped but look what happened when France did just that for 48 hours.
 

lloyd

Member
Location
Herefordshire
People travel should have been stopped but look what happened when France did just that for 48 hours.
Well you could of had exemptions for freight or anything important for
the security of the country but now it looks like the UK lockdown will
go on much longer than would have been necessary had stricter travel
controls been in place .Not good for mental health or large sectors of the economy.
Todays message from Matt Hancock seemed rather downbeat and not very seasonal.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
What has been learnt since March as it looks
like new strains have entered the UK from abroad?
Shouldn't people travel have stopped unless of significant
importance until Covid was under control?
Why do you say the new strain has entered the UK from abroad? It has been shown to be 'out of control' here, but only a few cases supposedly found elsewhere as yet. IF that is the case, then doesn't that point to the new variant being the result of a mutation that has occurred in the UK, and then spread elsewhere from here. :scratchhead:
 

lloyd

Member
Location
Herefordshire
Why do you say the new strain has entered the UK from abroad? It has been shown to be 'out of control' here, but only a few cases supposedly found elsewhere as yet. IF that is the case, then doesn't that point to the new variant being the result of a mutation that has occurred in the UK, and then spread elsewhere from here. :scratchhead:
There are two or three new strains as you know .
The one announced today has been traced from people
travelling from South Africa and is considered far more contagious
than the original strain ,so seems no doubt that has been imported.
The original new strain you might be right or you could be wrong
depending on how accurate other countries test and report so why take the chance .
Dont forget anything would spread fast in this country as it's a highly populated
country ,whereas transmission could be much slower in larger countries with fewer people.
We restrict animal movements when disease breaks out so why should potential human transmission be treated less seriously ?
 
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Y Fan Wen

Member
Location
N W Snowdonia
To shine a light on one of the greatest spending sprees in Britain’s postwar era, The New York Times analyzed a large segment of it, the roughly 1,200 central government contracts that have been made public, together worth nearly $22 billion. Of that, about $11 billion went to companies either run by friends and associates of politicians in the Conservative Party, or with no prior experience or a history of controversy. Meanwhile, smaller firms without political clout got nowhere….


The contracts that have been made public are only a part of the total. Citing the urgency of the pandemic, the government cast aside the usual transparency rules and awarded contracts worth billions of dollars without competitive bidding. To date, just over half of all of the contracts awarded in the first seven months remain concealed from the public, according to the National Audit Office, a watchdog agency…


In the government’s rush to hand out contracts, officials ignored or missed many red flags. Dozens of companies that won a total of $3.6 billion in contracts had poor credit, and several had declared assets of just $2 or $3 each. Others had histories of fraud, human rights abuses, tax evasion or other serious controversies. A few were set up on the spur of the moment or had no relevant experience — and still won contracts.

 
To shine a light on one of the greatest spending sprees in Britain’s postwar era, The New York Times analyzed a large segment of it, the roughly 1,200 central government contracts that have been made public, together worth nearly $22 billion. Of that, about $11 billion went to companies either run by friends and associates of politicians in the Conservative Party, or with no prior experience or a history of controversy. Meanwhile, smaller firms without political clout got nowhere….


The contracts that have been made public are only a part of the total. Citing the urgency of the pandemic, the government cast aside the usual transparency rules and awarded contracts worth billions of dollars without competitive bidding. To date, just over half of all of the contracts awarded in the first seven months remain concealed from the public, according to the National Audit Office, a watchdog agency…


In the government’s rush to hand out contracts, officials ignored or missed many red flags. Dozens of companies that won a total of $3.6 billion in contracts had poor credit, and several had declared assets of just $2 or $3 each. Others had histories of fraud, human rights abuses, tax evasion or other serious controversies. A few were set up on the spur of the moment or had no relevant experience — and still won contracts.
And your point is??? That is how governments work, that is why politicians that earn a pretty mediocre income can become extremely wealthy in a short period of time.
 
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analysis

Get ready for pest monitoring, advises PGRO

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham

The Processors and Growers Research Organisation (PGRO) has issued new advice to help growers understand the importance of measuring pest populations before any decisions are made on insecticides. Charlotte Cunningham reports. Ahead of the trapping season, the PGRO has produced a new masterclass video to help growers understand how to trap and assess pest populations. The key advice is that using a range of preventative tools will be crucial for farmers looking to reduce cases of pea and bean weevil, pea moth, and silver Y moth this spring, while finding more sustainable ways of farming in line with new agricultural policy, according to the PGRO’s research and...
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