Newbie question please

Discussion in 'Competition Ploughing' started by Grandad Pig, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. late MK2 puts it in the classic class some time,
    but a good plough to start with, get the frame right, and you could change the YLs at a later date
     
  2. arcobob

    arcobob Member

    Location:
    Norfolk
    I might persevere with this if I was going to plough vintage but that is not a long term option. If the boards are genuine Ransomes (ignore the stickers and look for the forged in logo) it has value if only for the bodies, but how much work do you put into it? I am trying to avoid pouring cold water but the " spend once" adage always applies in my book.
     
    Pennine Ploughing likes this.
  3. Grandad Pig

    Grandad Pig Member

    Thanks chaps.

    I had a chance to fiddle with it at the weekend. Wound the furrow adjuster for ages before I realised the big washer with a flat in it was not engaging with the slot machined in the cross shaft. (Sorry, I don’t yet know all the proper terms). I removed the washer, turned it through 180’ and cut off another bit, giving a longer ‘flat’ to engage the shaft. I now suspect the cranck’s are on wrong as it is impossible to level the plough with the levelling box.

    I think I can move the adjuster forward from where it is. Beginning to think the plough was put together by someone with even less knowledge than me. The old saying about fools and money might apply here.

    Will look for the Ransomes book.

    Thanks again

    Steve
     
  4. Mydexta

    Mydexta Member

    Location:
    Dundee/angus
    Was the plough bought via eBay???

    There was one very similar in there a few weeks back, and the seller was also selling various spares, which he said were left over from making up some ploughs.
     
  5. Grandad Pig

    Grandad Pig Member

    Yes, that’s the one. He lives close to me, and is a very nice chap. The big issue I have is lack of a car trailer or a car to pull it. The missus has a car but no towbar. So going miles to pick up stuff is bit awkward.

    I saw the location on eBay and realised he is in the next village, a twenty minute tractor drive. I bought a top link and drawbar off him then saw the ploughs. Basically picked one at random having no knowledge at all.
     
  6. arcobob

    arcobob Member

    Location:
    Norfolk
    The cross shaft winder on your plough is entirely off a Ransomes and your washer with a flat I guess is held within the clamp on the curved arm. This is a common modification to provide a key to run in the keyway cut in the shaft itself (not original). This allows the shaft to be moved from side to side through the frame with the arrm held in position with spacer sleeves on either side. The default position for this arrangement is with the nut on the thread at mid way and the right hand draft pin in the cranked vertically down and the left hand one up. Where you position the handle is up to you but you have to be able to wind it from the tractor seat as you travel across the field.
    Now you may face one of the joys of a Ford EP plough. The front of the frame is a cluttered nightmare of heavy duty cross braces which render the best choice position difficult to achieve.
    Another point you will have to address is the furrow width on this plough. It appears to be set at 12", which is too wide for best results with those bodies and 10" is the norm. You may have to move the front leg to the inside of the frame. You will then need your tractor wheels set at 52" centres at the rear and 48" at the front so that the inside measurements between tyres is the same front and back as near as possible. This should permit you to straddle about four furrow widths.
    It looks as though you really need some help from a top class local ploughman as you are going to end up along some blind alleys on your way. The man who sold you this plough is clearly not in that category.
    Below is a picture of a Ransomes plough(modified) to illustrate my points.
    Arco premises60.JPG
     
    Petetheploughman likes this.
  7. Grandad Pig

    Grandad Pig Member

    Wow, I didn’t expect that. Thank you so much mate. You are exactly right about the front braces. Bugger, looks like I have done it again
     
  8. Howard150

    Howard150 Member

    Location:
    Yorkshire
    In all fairness not a ridiculous plough to get you going and you have got the best of bodies for the vintage class. Might just help if you had skimmers mounted on the discs and tip the furrow width adjuster forward to where you can reach it as has already been said. It looks as though the plough is set at 12” which is far too wide for vintage. 10 is quite sufficient, some plough at 9 3/4. It will easier for you to use if the front leg stays outside the frame and you pack the back leg across.
    Mounting holes at the bottom of the leg are all standard on FR and Ransomes ploughs so you could always fit TCN’s if you want to plough in the Classic Class.
    Steer clear of Fergy ploughs unless you are pulling them with a grey Fergy. Only in the softest of sand will they be on terms with a pair of YL’s or TCN’s
    Just get to grips with using it. You don’t need anything too exotic until your skill level gets to be quite high. All singing all dancing is not an automatic passport to success. The main and oft flawed component fits somewhere twixt the seat, the steering wheel the hydraulic quadrant and the pedals!
    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
  9. Grandad Pig

    Grandad Pig Member

    Thank you Howard150. That’s encouraging at least. The trouble with mowing bugger all about something is that you know bugger all about it! So, not a huge mistake if I can get the width adjuster within reach. Will have a long calm look this evening after work.

    Thanks very much .
     
    Howard150 likes this.
  10. Howard150

    Howard150 Member

    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Just in passing. In your third picture, the crank on the furrow side looks well forward of centre. In an ideal world then this crank should be just forward of centre. With your cross shaft set like that then move the plough on the cross shaft to get the right front furrow width - bearing in mind your rear wheel track needs to be as close as possible to 56” with the insides of the front tyres aligned with the inside of the back.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
  11. arcobob

    arcobob Member

    Location:
    Norfolk
    Now you are confusing the issue. If he is going to plough 10” he will need the wheels at 52” centres rear and 48” front otherwise he will never get the front furrow narrow enough. My post #26.
     
    Howard150 likes this.
  12. Howard150

    Howard150 Member

    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Might struggle to get a 65 down to 52 - that’s the reason for quoting 56. Definitely won’t get the fronts down to 48. Please correct me if I’m wrong anybody out there.
     
  13. Ts 59

    Ts 59 Member

    Location:
    Isle of Man
    Used to use a mk2 65 in matches years ago, had fronts at 48 and rears at 52 . Was a good tractor, pulled really well.
     
    Howard150 likes this.
  14. Grandad Pig

    Grandad Pig Member

    This match ploughing lark is complicated isn’t it.

    If I can not get the width adjuster within reach of the seat, is this a massive issue or will it do for now. I guess adjusting will mean jumping on and off the tractor a lot. Only novice class at the moment.

    Will look at the wheel centres and get the tape measure out.

    Thanks chaps
     
  15. Howard150

    Howard150 Member

    Location:
    Yorkshire
    It is. You will need to adjust it as you are going in order to do any straightening. Your main priority now is just to get the plough going and get used to how it looks and feels. Lot to get your head round.
    Program of events....
    Get used to how the plough runs and keeping the tractor running in the right place up to the furrow wall. Good middle work usually follows on
    Get used to going straight enough for a good opening.
    Learn how to cut out a good opening.
    Learn how to start
    Learn how to finish
    Not all at once but get your head round each of these in turn.
    Look on Stokes of Tong Norton web page. Roy has some good pointers for beginners on there.


    I stand corrected
     
    tomlad and Ley253 like this.
  16. arcobob

    arcobob Member

    Location:
    Norfolk
    Altering the front furrow width is a progressive thing akin to steering the plough. During the ploughing of the plot you have to achieve two parallel straight furrows. It is possible to narrow the ploughing width by driving slightly off the furrow wall but you have no way of widening it. In any event this is a rather delicate operation to perform without attracting the attention of the judges because uniform furrow width is an important feature of good ploughing. You will soon come to realise that the width winder is the most important adjuster on the plough.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
  17. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    May I add to" keeping the tractor up to the furrow wall" Without holding the wheel at an angle, it must be close to, but parallel to the wall.
     
    Howard150 likes this.
  18. Grandad Pig

    Grandad Pig Member

    So, I guess set up is important so the plough follows the tractor without undue lateral movement.

    My copy of Good Ploughing arrives tomorrow so perhaps I will bother you guys less after that.

    Thanks again.
     
  19. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Have no fear, we do not mind people who want advice, and act on it,. However, those who want an argument are less than popular!
     
  20. tomlad

    tomlad Member

    Location:
    nr. preston
    @Grandad Pig you will or hopefully will still be scaching head and asking questions long after you've read every book there is, not a insult sir ! We are all learning, 'every day's a school day ' .
    These chaps do know what there talking about. All VERY confusing at first.
    But if u ask for help ,some body ussualy does .
    Honestly all the best and go enjoy it (y)
     

Share This Page