Old milking parlours for small herds

Swaley

Member
Livestock Farmer
Hello all,
Is it wanting to know if anyone is still milking small herds or any size herds in older style parlours e.g. byres, step up parlours or abreast. It would be interesting to see some photos of them if possible also how long does it take you to milk the cows through it.
Many thanks all.
 

vulcan

Member
Location
carlisle
Hello all,
Is it wanting to know if anyone is still milking small herds or any size herds in older style parlours e.g. byres, step up parlours or abreast. It would be interesting to see some photos of them if possible also how long does it take you to milk the cows through it.
Many thanks all.
20200921_173309.jpg

Here you go here's our set up thought I had more pictures on my phone but only got this 1 there is more pictures on another thread on here somewhere.
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
but it Cleary shows you don't have to spend a fortune on a parlour to start milking again. We went back into milk in 2007, the old herringbone parlour, had been removed and converted, we couldn't find a 2nd hand h/bone, but found an abreast locally, measured up, made the step up to match, with sterling board, poured the concrete, bolted down the abreast, and away we went. We made the decision, we had a very tight window to do it, it was 4 weeks, from thinking about it, to the tanker arriving, we used that parlour for 3 years, till we replaced with h/b. The total cost of putting in the abreast, including bulk tank, was £5,000, plus a lot of hard work by us. But a simple parlour, even a shippon, though some processors ban their use, can be incredibly cheap to install. Disagreeing with many, a keen/dedicated person, could very easily get into milk production, without spending a fortune, perfectly good cows, go through market rings, with a 'fault', light, 3/4, slightly lame, or 'senior', for a lot less than a £1,000, if you were prepared to sit on your hands at dispersals, sound, but faulted cows, as above, could be bought for £5/600. I suspect the hardest part would be the buyer. We were lucky, local cheese maker had ours, and not fussy about cc, we bought a lot of cows sub £450, milked our suckler hfrs, not pretty, but got us going. Now 24/24 hb, and 180 cows, that, we could never have done, without the 'cheapy parlour' and 'ugly' cows.
 

LTH

Member
Livestock Farmer
but it Cleary shows you don't have to spend a fortune on a parlour to start milking again. We went back into milk in 2007, the old herringbone parlour, had been removed and converted, we couldn't find a 2nd hand h/bone, but found an abreast locally, measured up, made the step up to match, with sterling board, poured the concrete, bolted down the abreast, and away we went. We made the decision, we had a very tight window to do it, it was 4 weeks, from thinking about it, to the tanker arriving, we used that parlour for 3 years, till we replaced with h/b. The total cost of putting in the abreast, including bulk tank, was £5,000, plus a lot of hard work by us. But a simple parlour, even a shippon, though some processors ban their use, can be incredibly cheap to install. Disagreeing with many, a keen/dedicated person, could very easily get into milk production, without spending a fortune, perfectly good cows, go through market rings, with a 'fault', light, 3/4, slightly lame, or 'senior', for a lot less than a £1,000, if you were prepared to sit on your hands at dispersals, sound, but faulted cows, as above, could be bought for £5/600. I suspect the hardest part would be the buyer. We were lucky, local cheese maker had ours, and not fussy about cc, we bought a lot of cows sub £450, milked our suckler hfrs, not pretty, but got us going. Now 24/24 hb, and 180 cows, that, we could never have done, without the 'cheapy parlour' and 'ugly' cows.
It was built in about 1955, at the time would have been very modern with the straight glass milk line, thought about converting it or just putting a new abreast in to take a bit of time off, I’m not keen on herringbone parlours.
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
It was built in about 1955, at the time would have been very modern with the straight glass milk line, thought about converting it or just putting a new abreast in to take a bit of time off, I’m not keen on herringbone parlours.
got some farm and country mags from 1950/51, you could have a 'double' 24 cow barn, erected, with milk line, for £1,200. ish, 2 firms advertising that.
 

LTH

Member
Livestock Farmer
got some farm and country mags from 1950/51, you could have a 'double' 24 cow barn, erected, with milk line, for £1,200. ish, 2 firms advertising that.
It’s built by Atcost, with a mix of fullwood, Alfa-laval interior, and manus tank. Not the original tank but be 30yrs plus
 

LTH

Member
Livestock Farmer
Iv sean similar in old barns never actually in use. Does it mean bringing fresh heifers in a two person job. Cows are great credit to you
Thanks trying to keep improving them pedigree Friesian is the dream. It can be, they were a bit too well petted this time so wasn’t too much of an issue, have to have a rope behind them though so they don’t walk back when cakes finished and rip the whole lot off!
 

Starane Hi-Load HL has been granted a new EAMU for BLW control in Millet

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Starane Hi-Load HL has been granted a new EAMU for BLW control in Millet

"With the loss of Bromoxynil another BLW herbicide was needed" says Premium Crops Company Agronomist, Hannah Foxall,"Having fluroxypyr as a Post-Emergence option will enhance our control of; cleavers, knotgrass, black nightshade, fumitory, chickweed and black bindweed in the millet crop"

As with all EAMUs any restrictions guidance stated on the products labels must be adhered to and the approval document can be found by clicking...
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