Red Welsh sheep dogs.

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Dad went and bought a pup from a very convincing Welshman a while ago. Apparently they are bred only from working dogs so they train themselves, it’s just in ‘em see.
Dad used to take her with him round the cows all the time, and she was always bobbling round the yards with him. She never did do anything half useful though, not showing any interest in any stock, and could best be described as about as useful as tits on a bull.🤐

She was a lovely character though, and has made a good companion for him in the last few years. Sadly she died a few months back, leaving a big hole.:(

As far as working dogs go, I dare say they are as variable as collies or any other breed. There will good, bad and downright infuriating in all of them.
 

scholland

Member
Location
ze3
There will likely be ones in every breed that won't work.
It's the style of work that made me choose a Welsh dog.
Hope to have pups here soon from red parents, both good dogs the bitch is especially good.
 
I had a red Welsh sheepdog, he was the best dog I've had. They work differently to collies with a lot less eye, I'd certainly have another one. Mine worked cattle and sheep on a reasonable sized hill farm and was fantastic on both.
 

Martyn

Member
Location
South west
Iv got one about six years old super with three young children and great pet, would rather go off chasing butterflies than do any stock work, useless!!
We have a Welsh collie cross hunterway super dog, always wants to please very gently with sheep, great with voice only ever barks when working.
 
Iv got one about six years old super with three young children and great pet, would rather go off chasing butterflies than do any stock work, useless!!
We have a Welsh collie cross hunterway super dog, always wants to please very gently with sheep, great with voice only ever barks when working.
No such thing as a Welsh collie so may not be a proper Welsh sheepdog you have? But as said before, good, bad and indifferent workers in every breed.
 

Beames

Member
Location
South wales
My landlord has one. Hasn’t been trained properly and Never stops barking. I hate it when he’s around my cows as he’s 100 mile an hour.
 

Danllan

Member
Location
Sir Gar / Carms
We bought one just before lock down. Very bright, quick to learn, very nice nature, almost unbelievably destructive if left anywhere destructible for any period longer than a few minutes. :arghh: :banghead:

Works well with the sheep; like Border Collies they do have the 'instinct', and she will herd by herself, but obviously needs direction to get a job done. If an amateur like me can train one to work, anyone can. They do like their voice, which is fine now on command, very helpful sometimes, but was very annoying initially.

She's not used with the cattle, although not afraid of them, shows no interest in trying to work them either.
 

scholland

Member
Location
ze3
No such thing as a Welsh collie so may not be a proper Welsh sheepdog you have? But as said before, good, bad and indifferent workers in every breed.
There are a fair few dogs from Wales advertised as welsh sheepdogs, couple of decent Facebook pages for the breed now where the committee can advise if a dog is the real thing.

Certainly no guarantees they will all work and there are even different types within the welsh breed.
 

Mc115reed

Member
Dad went and bought a pup from a very convincing Welshman a while ago. Apparently they are bred only from working dogs so they train themselves, it’s just in ‘em see.
Dad used to take her with him round the cows all the time, and she was always bobbling round the yards with him. She never did do anything half useful though, not showing any interest in any stock, and could best be described as about as useful as tits on a bull.

She was a lovely character though, and has made a good companion for him in the last few years. Sadly she died a few months back, leaving a big hole.:(

As far as working dogs go, I dare say they are as variable as collies or any other breed. There will good, bad and downright infuriating in all of them.
Did you try putting on a dodgey Welsh accent? My dog I bought off a dodgey looking Welshman was fudgeing useless until I started shouting at it in a dodgey welsh accent now I couldn’t cope without her just get a few dodgey looks...
 

Exile_AM

New Member
Trade
We’ve had Welsh reds in the family as pets for a few years, with the latest acquired this December. This was swapping over from Borders. We’re farming adjacent though, so do feel the odd twinge of guilt they don’t get to work sheep. My observation is they have many common collie characteristics beyond the obvious shape and look. The instinct to circle, nip at toddlers etc, similar athleticism, similar desire to associate with humans over other dogs. But different to Borders in the stronger bodies, less eye as many have said, more vocal, don’t creep quite as well. My outlaws and I have guessed maybe the stronger frame for cattle work means the gap in the shoulder blades is a a bit more restricted than in Borders. They also seem less prone to obsession with objects. Admittedly this is all off a small sample size.

I wondered given their dual use with cattle, until more recently, whether they’d be suited to working something primitive like Shetlands? I’ve ready many a Shetland post on here say you need ‘a good dog’, a ‘grippy, catchy dog’, ‘a dog with strong eye won’t do’.
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
We’ve had Welsh reds in the family as pets for a few years, with the latest acquired this December. This was swapping over from Borders. We’re farming adjacent though, so do feel the odd twinge of guilt they don’t get to work sheep. My observation is they have many common collie characteristics beyond the obvious shape and look. The instinct to circle, nip at toddlers etc, similar athleticism, similar desire to associate with humans over other dogs. But different to Borders in the stronger bodies, less eye as many have said, more vocal, don’t creep quite as well. My outlaws and I have guessed maybe the stronger frame for cattle work means the gap in the shoulder blades is a a bit more restricted than in Borders. They also seem less prone to obsession with objects. Admittedly this is all off a small sample size.

I wondered given their dual use with cattle, until more recently, whether they’d be suited to working something primitive like Shetlands? I’ve ready many a Shetland post on here say you need ‘a good dog’, a ‘grippy, catchy dog’, ‘a dog with strong eye won’t do’.
For shetlands you need a .243.
 
Tags
sheep

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