Shepherds' Wages

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
Hi All,

My father in law was rubbishing my tack sheep plans the other day. Apparently I need to 'stop mucking about and get a real job'.

So that I've got some figures to go back to him with, would anyone give me an idea of shepherds' salaries? For say singled handed on 1500 ewes on an outdoor lambing system (I've done shed lambing and will never go back!). It would need to include a 3 bed house, as I'm married with children and we probably couldn't afford to buy in a new area.

Thanks all.
 

exmoor dave

Member
Location
exmoor, uk
Hi All,

My father in law was rubbishing my tack sheep plans the other day. Apparently I need to 'stop mucking about and get a real job'.

So that I've got some figures to go back to him with, would anyone give me an idea of shepherds' salaries? For say singled handed on 1500 ewes on an outdoor lambing system (I've done shed lambing and will never go back!). It would need to include a 3 bed house, as I'm married with children and we probably couldn't afford to buy in a new area.

Thanks all.

What does FiL do for a living?
 

DB67

Member
Location
Scotland
What sort of inputs and breeds and rent per acre vs stock density.
With the right sheep and breeding and all grass no brought in food I'd say 1500 ewes should be able to give you a take home pay around 40k-60k

You'd need a fair bit of help if you had 1500 ewes by yourself. Lambing, shearing etc.
 
I think, reading the initial post, the OP is asking - what kind of salary could he expect if employed to shepherd the above on a full time employed basis, and will then compare it to what he will make just tacking other peoples sheep on a seasonal basis. I guess FIL is suggesting there may be more money and better security in the former. . . .
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
I think, reading the initial post, the OP is asking - what kind of salary could he expect if employed to shepherd the above on a full time employed basis, and will then compare it to what he will make just tacking other peoples sheep on a seasonal basis. I guess FIL is suggesting there may be more money and better security in the former. . . .
Cheers mate. I'm never clear writing after a beer!
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
What sort of inputs and breeds and rent per acre vs stock density.
With the right sheep and breeding and all grass no brought in food I'd say 1500 ewes should be able to give you a take home pay around 40k-60k
Thanks. I was more thinking as an employed shepherd looking after someone else's flock. Any ideas?
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
With a vehicle and a house up to 25k would be typical.
Maybe a little more if all the shearing/crutching was done by him as well.

One man to 1500 ewes is what we work on, and that is only part time on sheep. One assistant at lambing time, working on around 155% lambing on an outdoor system.
Thanks very much that's really helpful.
 

S J H

Member
Location
Bedfordshire
I'd love to. But in order to maintain marital bliss at home, I need to be slightly more diplomatic...
Yes sorry, my post wasn't very helpful. But after speaking to you previously you obviously know your costings, he's made his career the way he wanted to do it, so IMO you should be able to do the same.

That said, I'd say £30k with a house.
 

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Deed not breed

Report shows environment subsidies provide more stable income than direct payments

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham

Subsidies paid to farmers for protecting the environment lead to more stable incomes compared with payments based purely on the number of ha being farmed, according to a new study of farms in England and Wales. Charlotte Cunningham reports. The research, from Rothamsted Research, the University of Reading and Newcastle University, also shows that farmers shouldn’t put all their eggs in one basket, as those diversifying into a wider variety of crops or livestock receive more consistent year-to-year incomes – as do those who reduce their use of fertiliser and pesticides. Lead author and PhD student, Caroline Harkness said: “Farmers are facing increasing pressures due...
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