Soya, whats the right way of it.

johnspeehs

Member
Location
Co Antrim
Can anyone explain the right way of soya production? having an argument with someone who says 90% is grown for livestock and only 10% for humans but is the oil not removed from it for human use and what's left is soya as we know it ?
 

andybk

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Mendips Somerset
Can anyone explain the right way of soya production? having an argument with someone who says 90% is grown for livestock and only 10% for humans but is the oil not removed from it for human use and what's left is soya as we know it ?
I would think 90% of the by-product is used in livestock , but the opposite for primary use , edible oils and vegan products
ie tofu https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tofu
a lot is used in bio fuels as well
basically if stock didnt use whats left , it would be just wasted , fresh soya beans would prob be to high in oil to feed straight in any quantity
so yes i would say its mostly grown for human use maybe indirectly or in a hidden way
 

JJT

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Cumbria

Boysground

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
Biggest problem with not feeding soya is when Erith catches fire ....., again. There have been a few supply issues with osr meal this winter. Have a supply of beans which is useful at least they only travel 20 miles to get here.

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Biggest problem with not feeding soya is when Erith catches fire ....., again. There have been a few supply issues with osr meal this winter. Have a supply of beans which is useful at least they only travel 20 miles to get here.

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Beans are a great feed and you get a slug of starch with them. Very very good in beef rations. I used to buy and formulate a heck of a lot of beans. Used to truck them in from all over.
 

Ted M

Member
As I understand it, it takes around 7-8 tonnes of soya bean to yield 1 tonne of oil.
That gives you about 6-7 tonnes of by product.
I think I read somewhere that the oil is worth 4x more than the remaining meal.
I suppose the question is wether growing soya would remain viable if the outlet for the by product was removed?
But primarily its grown an industrial oil source which would probably be replaced by more palm oil plantations if it became uneconomic.
A vegan nutter replied to something I put on Facebook months ago the other day and said that 75% of soya bean production by weight was fed to livestock.
What they fail or refuse to see is that the other 25% is the primary cause of its existence.
If anyone thinks I'm mistaken in any of that or has something to add please shout up👍
 

Farmer Fin

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Aberdeenshire
I would think 90% of the by-product is used in livestock , but the opposite for primary use , edible oils and vegan products
ie tofu https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tofu
a lot is used in bio fuels as well
basically if stock didnt use whats left , it would be just wasted , fresh soya beans would prob be to high in oil to feed straight in any quantity
so yes i would say its mostly grown for human use maybe indirectly or in a hidden way
Pretty valuable by product at circa £300 per tonne. Let’s not kid ourselves that we fuel demand. Even if it’s not directly it all adds to what it’s worth and demand. Even this buying responsible grown soya stuff is just marketing.
 

bitwrx

Member
Biggest problem with not feeding soya is when Erith catches fire ....., again. There have been a few supply issues with osr meal this winter. Have a supply of beans which is useful at least they only travel 20 miles to get here.

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Effin right. Our non-Erith OSR meal appears to have been delivered in pebble form. Won't go through our liquid feed system in anything approaching the level we'd normally feed. Phoned the supplier. They told me to like it or lump it. Strokers.
 

Fergieman

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Northumberland

I am using neolac rapemeal along with homegrown maxammon cereals this year for all youngstock, fattening cattle, and sheep. We also used it for the dairy cows through the summer. Had a blend forward bought for the winter so using that just now but will go back to neolac after the blend is finished.
 

Farmer Fin

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Aberdeenshire

I am using neolac rapemeal along with homegrown maxammon cereals this year for all youngstock, fattening cattle, and sheep. We also used it for the dairy cows through the summer. Had a blend forward bought for the winter so using that just now but will go back to neolac after the blend is finished.
What norvite and others are doing is the way forward. We have to make better use of home grown proteins.
 

melted welly

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
DD9.
Can anyone explain the right way of soya production? having an argument with someone who says 90% is grown for livestock and only 10% for humans but is the oil not removed from it for human use and what's left is soya as we know it ?


this is a report about ALL soya imports to Uk, oil, meal, and whole beans.

as I read it, UK imports around 200,000l soya oil annually. Takes 7kg of soya beans to produce 1l oil, thus producing a byproduct of around 1.4m tonnes of meal. Uk imports around 2m tonnes of meal annually, 750k tonnes of whole soybeans also imported.

main source of imports are from south America, mostly Argentina. This is both direct imports and indirectly mainly thru the Netherlands. So where soya oil is imported from “Europe” fair chance its just been processed in Holland from South American crop. Inconvenient fact if your sparring partner is one who “ethically“ only buys European soya.

Ive not read the whole report, but it seems pretty much a definite article.
 

Boysground

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
Effin right. Our non-Erith OSR meal appears to have been delivered in pebble form. Won't go through our liquid feed system in anything approaching the level we'd normally feed. Phoned the supplier. They told me to like it or lump it. Strokers.

I know of one supplier who couldn’t make deliveries. We have been ok, fed the beans to stretch the deliveries we had booked.

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Boysground

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
I’m not the diet expert on the farm but we do have to watch how much we feed as they are low in one amino acid, think it’s either lysine or methionine. The diet seems to go well, we just have to watch the fat, not being the highest fat producer we can stray into low fat claims if we are not careful.

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JJT

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Cumbria
As I understand it, it takes around 7-8 tonnes of soya bean to yield 1 tonne of oil.
That gives you about 6-7 tonnes of by product.
I think I read somewhere that the oil is worth 4x more than the remaining meal.
I suppose the question is wether growing soya would remain viable if the outlet for the by product was removed?
But primarily its grown an industrial oil source which would probably be replaced by more palm oil plantations if it became uneconomic.
A vegan nutter replied to something I put on Facebook months ago the other day and said that 75% of soya bean production by weight was fed to livestock.
What they fail or refuse to see is that the other 25% is the primary cause of its existence.
If anyone thinks I'm mistaken in any of that or has something to add please shout up👍
if you google soya oil price first result that comes up puts oil at $930/ton and the same website puts soya meal at $430/ton. Which means per ton of soya beans you get more from the meal than the oil unfortunatly. Bit that doesn't get away from the fact that if soya wasn't grown the oil would have to come from somewhere else. Most probably palm oil.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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