Take-all in first wheat.

pipestretcher

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
In a year that keeps on giving, I'm now finding quite a lot of Take-all in first wheats, predominantly on the secondary tillers but some areas where all the plants are affected. This is March drilled Belepi after V. Peas. Anyone else got similar or am I the 'chosen one'!
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Hindsight

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
In a year that keeps on giving, I'm now finding quite a lot of Take-all in first wheats, predominantly on the secondary tillers but some areas where all the plants are affected. This is March drilled Belepi after V. Peas. Anyone else got similar or am I the 'chosen one'!View attachment 893225View attachment 893226View attachment 893227View attachment 893228

To get a correct identification probably need to submit a sample to a Plant Clinic. I would suspect a Fusarium infection rather than Take All but am no way and expert and would doff my cap to a true Plant Pathologist and hence why a sample to a Plant Clinic. FERA / NIAB.

If you do submit a sample carefully dig out some roots to send as well as the stem.
 

bankrupt

Member
Location
EX17/20
If you do submit a sample carefully dig out some roots to send as well as the stem.
Good point.

We've got what looks like take-all all over our first wheats but I put it all down to the waterlogging suffered here in June.

It's the worst "take-all" on first wheats here since 1991 when we had a big investigation set up to find someone to claim against which eventually concluded - waterlogging!

:D:D
 
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Given the extreme weather we have had it is possible the crops have been stressed at some point and let their guard down, so to speak. Bit of foliar phosphate and magphos K next autumn once it is established and it will probably never be seen again.

I am convinced much depends on soil and plant health when it comes to take-all.
 

CORK

Member
I would 2nd @Hindsight with fusarium being the most likely culprit. Look for pink on the internodes especially lower down. Ive got some showing in crops myself.
I’ll add my vote to that. I saw some on Monday also looking very similar. You could see that it had been linked to some older structural damage which made the water logging effect worse.

That said, I did see some take all in 1st wheat last year. Compaction and slightly low pH had played a part that time.
 

BenB

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Newbury, Berks
Agree with all the above, found a small patch appearing in some 1st WW a couple of weeks ago, found it quite interesting as never seen much of it before (not that I want to!)


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Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
Is there any treatment for future reference? Which fusarium species do you suspect here? Nivale? Obviously this can't be fixed now. Seed testing then dressing if required? So exceptional that this is a one off and not worth spending £££ on?

The proper answer is good soil structure and health that deny the pathogen the conditions to thrive in. And not mauling seed into wet slop, but that easy to say sitting at a keyboard in July instead of March when the ground is still sodden from months of rain and you haven't got much wheat in, if any.
 

shakerator

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
LINCS
Could it be something mechanical ie insect severing the stem. Would fusarium cause bleaching of the whole tiller ? Looks like the stems just had its nutrient and water supply “cut off”
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
Could it be something mechanical ie insect severing the stem. Would fusarium cause bleaching of the whole tiller ? Looks like the stems just had its nutrient and water supply “cut off”

That's a good question, but the OP should be past the danger point for Wheat Bulb Fly and it certainly wouldn't affect the tillers more than the main stem.
 
My father had fusarium foot rotbad in the 1970s
The field was old meadow never been cropped for many decades
Flat on the floor could not have rolled it flatter

same field 10 years later yielded over 10 per ha

fields after long term grass take a few year to get into full cereal production due to grassland pests and deseases
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
Could it be something mechanical ie insect severing the stem. Would fusarium cause bleaching of the whole tiller ? Looks like the stems just had its nutrient and water supply “cut off”
That's exactly what I've found on an odd plant. From a distance it looks like a plant affected by take all but on closer inspection it's easy to pull the stem out and just above the first node the stem has been chewed through with a ragged edge just like bulb fly but it seems to late to be bulb fly.

This field is first wheat after beet and it did suffer some wbf damage early on but these plants aren't where the bulb fly patches where.

Edit. On a separate note has anyone on lightland had trouble with ryhzoctonia or nematode damage in winter barley. I have some patches in WB that I thought was drought but NIAB seem to think it could be ryhzoctonia.
 

shakerator

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
LINCS
That's exactly what I've found on an odd plant. From a distance it looks like a plant affected by take all but on closer inspection it's easy to pull the stem out and just above the first node the stem has been chewed through with a ragged edge just like bulb fly but it seems to late to be bulb fly.

This field is first wheat after beet and it did suffer some wbf damage early on but these plants aren't where the bulb fly patches where.

Edit. On a separate note has anyone on lightland had trouble with ryhzoctonia or nematode damage in winter barley. I have some patches in WB that I thought was drought but NIAB seem to think it could be ryhzoctonia.

yes we have had big problems with it this spring on sand in spring wheat

is the barley second cereal ?

pest could be cereal stem saw fly

a good year for insects

not eceonimcally important

don’t think it’s take all or fusarium as single tiller affected and bleached all the way down stem
 
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robbie

Member
BASIS
yes we have had big problems with it this spring on sand in spring wheat

is the barley second cereal ?

pest could be cereal stem saw fly

a good year for insects

not eceonimcally important

don’t think it’s take all or fusarium as single tiller affected and bleached all the way down stem
Interesting, it's the winter barley that the rhyzoctonia has affected(we think) barley is a mix of 2nd,3rd and 4th cereals.

I'll google stem saw fly, I think it's what it must be.
 

LIVE - DEFRA SFI Janet Hughes “ask me anything” 19:00-20:00 20th September (Today)

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Hello, I’m Janet Hughes. I’m the Programme Director for the Future Farming and Countryside Programme in Defra – the programme that’s phasing out the Common Agricultural Policy and introducing new schemes and services for farmers.



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