The Princes Fund calls for evidence on UK livestock markets

JP1

Member
Livestock Farmer
The Prince's Countryside Fund calls for evidence on UK Livestock Markets
The Prince’s Countryside Fund has commissioned academics at the University of Exeter to undertake a study on the social benefit, functions of, and prospects for, livestock auction marts in the UK.
Following HRH The Prince of Wales’ visit to Louth market in March 2018, the Fund has been keen to look at how the vital social role of markets can be supported. A research project jointly funded by The Prince’s Countryside Fund and the John Oldacre Endowment at the University of Exeter is an opportunity to showcase the potential for markets to realise the full extent of the service that they provide to the farming community and to ensure that they are in the best position possible to be able to offer the support that the industry requires during this period of transition.
Researchers at the University of Exeter would like to hear from auctioneers, livestock owners and any other stakeholders who use auction marts as they research the unique contribution these businesses make to the UK’s rural communities.
Researchers want to know what livestock auction marts contribute to the agricultural sector, the rural economy and communities and the countryside. The research, carried out by the Centre for Rural Policy Research (CRPR) will examine how a viable, socially responsible and vibrant livestock auction mart sector can be encouraged and supported.
Claire Saunders, Director of The Prince’s Countryside Fund said: “We have commissioned this research following our work with the Livestock Auctioneers Association. We understand that Auction Marts are often at the heart of their agricultural communities, however, we are aware of the difficulties that many of these businesses are facing. We hope that this research will offer practical recommendations to help them prepare for the future and ensure their long term survival.”
Professor Michael Winter OBE, Professor of Land Economy and Society at the Centre for Rural Policy Research at the University of Exeter, said: “We are anxious to hear from all those with a stake and interest in the future of livestock market in the UK, to help us identify examples of good practice as markets adapt to changing demands and circumstances.”
Chris Dodd’s of the Livestock Auctioneers’ Association (LAA) says that, “Although the basic principles of the livestock auction market are to ensure that a fair trade is achievable for all livestock producers, through the competitive and transparent bidding platform that the live ring provides, markets are also a vitally important link in the chain to ensuring we continue to see sustainable agricultural and wider rural communities. The social and mental health benefits provided by a vibrant auction mart business are often overlooked but should not be underestimated. Many markets offer a wide range of services, especially on a market day, and it is clear that the farming community benefit from many of these. We welcome the opportunity of working with The Prince’s Countryside Fund to assist our members in developing a broad offering of services that can further benefit those within our rural communities”.
To respond to the call for evidence please click here.
Evidence should be submitted by February 28th 2020.



 

Yorkshire lad

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
YO42
Chris Dodd’s of the Livestock Auctioneers’ Association (LAA) says that, “Although the basic principles of the livestock auction market are to ensure that a fair trade is achievable for all livestock producers, through the competitive and transparent bidding platform that the live ring provides, markets are also a vitally important link in the chain to ensuring we continue to see sustainable agricultural and wider rural communities. The social and mental health benefits provided

How competative and transparant are fatstock markets these days. Sat around the ring at most fatstock markets are half a dozen buyers who are buying on 4/5 accounts each. Surley this is anti competative and clouds transparancey Most machinary, antique sales use Internet bidding but fatstock markets seeem to be stuck in the past
 

bluebell

Member
all very well and good when you talk about this and many others in the classroom? but the sad truth is livestock markets have been shutting and are still shutting for many reasons, some top reasons is the decline in small livestock farmers, and the advent of online trading of livestock, which ive used, links the buyer and seller cuts out the middle man and the disease risk of animals mixing at a livestock market? big big big downside is when my local livestock market shut a few years back is the social side of seeing and sharing your thoughts at the mart, another was we used to take our animals to the market in a trailer, it was about 20 miles and had the advantage of bringing them home if the price wasnt right?
 

JP1

Member
Livestock Farmer
all very well and good when you talk about this and many others in the classroom? but the sad truth is livestock markets have been shutting and are still shutting for many reasons, some top reasons is the decline in small livestock farmers, and the advent of online trading of livestock, which ive used, links the buyer and seller cuts out the middle man and the disease risk of animals mixing at a livestock market? big big big downside is when my local livestock market shut a few years back is the social side of seeing and sharing your thoughts at the mart, another was we used to take our animals to the market in a trailer, it was about 20 miles and had the advantage of bringing them home if the price wasnt right?
and in turn our trailers killed off the local livestock haulier with a range of wagons 7-18 tonne .............
 

Yorkshire lad

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
YO42
all very well and good when you talk about this and many others in the classroom? but the sad truth is livestock markets have been shutting and are still shutting for many reasons, some top reasons is the decline in small livestock farmers, and the advent of online trading of livestock, which ive used, links the buyer and seller cuts out the middle man and the disease risk of animals mixing at a livestock market? big big big downside is when my local livestock market shut a few years back is the social side of seeing and sharing your thoughts at the mart, another was we used to take our animals to the market in a trailer, it was about 20 miles and had the advantage of bringing them home if the price wasnt right?

I get the social side of markets But I struggle to find the time to spend half a day in a market
There is also the disease issue of markets that’s not great for the industry
If all markets can offer is the social side of their business they may as well shut the market now and keep the cafe open as a Ag social club
 

Hfd Cattle

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Hereford
A real buzz of activity in Hereford market Wed and Thurs this week . A lot business done and a lot of people employed who only need a couple of days a week extra work. The biggest concern is the fact that the Auctioneers are getting more fussy who they will stop and talk to . They need to remember the market is made up of many people with smaller lots of sheep/ cattle and not quite so many of the big number vendors these days . We will however rue the day when the livestock markets are no more .....
 

delilah

Member
I'm sorry, I know I sound like a stuck record, put me on block if it bores you.
In the absence of addressing market share in food retailing, all of these studies/commissions/reports/ calls for evidence, which come out in one form or other on a weekly basis, are p!ssing in the wind.
Of course there's only 4 or 5 buyers round the ring. There's only 4 or 5 abattoir owners wanting the stock, to supply 4 or 5 end customers. It's not rocket science.
 

Old Tip

Member
Location
Cumbria
It’s very interesting how some markets are seemingly thriving and others are struggling. Seems to me there are many factors but the main ones are carrying debt burden which is because the supermarkets are slow payers therefore the buyers are slow to cough up. Secondly it’s the problem of not owning the premises and so not being in control or being able to handle the dept against the assets.
Other things come into the equation like access to to the motorway, good management and trust.
I use several auctions as well as selling deadweight through an auction and I enjoy having a chat and catching up with a few folk as well as getting a good look at what the buyers want. It’s interesting also that pigs have started coming back to the auctions in the north where they haven’t been seen for maybe fifty years. Many small producers who don’t have the volume for the big factories can sell direct to local butchers who get the value for traditional pork which actually tastes of something.
The other big issue which is the lack of small slaughter houses to kill locally bought stock, when I started their was a slaughter house next door to most auctions and I would love to see this come back. Better for the buyer, seller and the animals
 

primmiemoo

Member
Location
Devon
The thing is, the study is about how livestock markets benefit community.
Obviously, they must thrive, and must be well integrated to their market towns in order to boost the economy within their catchments, but this is about matters that are less easy to quantify.

I can't think of a livestock market that isn't a boon to community, and can think of some that go above and beyond (what business benefit is there in having a Chaplain, or a medical room, f'rinstance? Don't some markets have both?).

My nagging concern about the angle of the study's approach will be that such beacons will be seen by those outside of farming as a reason to create or perpetuate stereotypes of "all farmers do x", leading to complacency within other rural organisations that have historically had strong instruction to be social and community hubs, and subsequently lead to overlooking the needs of farmers who do not attend livestock markets for whatever reasons (some of us are carers, f'rinstance, or ill ourselves, or have very busy family commitments; some of us sell all stock dwt, f'rinstance, quite possibly for all or some of the reasons above).

Could a link to this thread be submitted to Prof Winter et al, as evidence, please?
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Of course there's only 4 or 5 buyers round the ring. There's only 4 or 5 abattoir owners wanting the stock, to supply 4 or 5 end customers. It's not rocket science.

But each buyer (dealer) has 4, 5, 6 accounts they are buying for...

If each buyer only represented/bought for 1 abattoir/processor, the ringside would be a lot busier and trade would be healthier due to REAL competition.
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
The thing is, the study is about how livestock markets benefit community.
Obviously, they must thrive, and must be well integrated to their market towns in order to boost the economy within their catchments, but this is about matters that are less easy to quantify.

I can't think of a livestock market that isn't a boon to community, and can think of some that go above and beyond (what business benefit is there in having a Chaplain, or a medical room, f'rinstance? Don't some markets have both?).

My nagging concern about the angle of the study's approach will be that such beacons will be seen by those outside of farming as a reason to create or perpetuate stereotypes of "all farmers do x", leading to complacency within other rural organisations that have historically had strong instruction to be social and community hubs, and subsequently lead to overlooking the needs of farmers who do not attend livestock markets for whatever reasons (some of us are carers, f'rinstance, or ill ourselves, or have very busy family commitments; some of us sell all stock dwt, f'rinstance, quite possibly for all or some of the reasons above).

Could a link to this thread be submitted to Prof Winter et al, as evidence, please?
Yes i agree, and that's why the likes of the FCN came about.

I expect Michael will be aware of farming forums.
Ref.the student that put a request for help/ info on here back along.....
 

delilah

Member
But each buyer (dealer) has 4, 5, 6 accounts they are buying for...

If each buyer only represented/bought for 1 abattoir/processor, the ringside would be a lot busier and trade would be healthier due to REAL competition.

You can't make each buyer at the ringside only be buying for one customer. Anyway, if you did they would find a way round it in 5 seconds flat. It's not feasible for a butcher who only needs one bullock a week to stand there all morning waiting for that animal to come in to the ring.

6 businesses are responsible for over 80% of UK food retailing. Call it an oligopoly, call it a cartel, call it what you like. I cannot see any way in which you can have the real competition you want to see at the ring side so long as the end market is thus.
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
You can't make each buyer at the ringside only be buying for one customer. Anyway, if you did they would find a way round it in 5 seconds flat. It's not feasible for a butcher who only needs one bullock a week to stand there all morning waiting for that animal to come in to the ring.

6 businesses are responsible for over 80% of UK food retailing. Call it an oligopoly, call it a cartel, call it what you like. I cannot see any way in which you can have the real competition you want to see at the ring side so long as the end market is thus.


I agree, but my point is when a new face shows up to buy - trade jumps markedly (or that's how it is here at Dumfries).

I've never seen a dealer step on his own toes to secure filling his orders...
 

Latest Poll on TFF

  • Yes

    Votes: 22 14.9%
  • No

    Votes: 126 85.1%

JCB launches Fastrac ‘iCon’

  • 180
  • 0
Written by Charlotte Cunningham from CPM Magazine

JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
Top