Thought some of you would like to see a cotton gin

N Turner

Member
thumbCottonGin.jpg
 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
So, as we see more "exotic" crops grown in UK conditions, what are we missing for growing cotton? Too cold? Too humid?

too cold, too short a summer growing season, too humid, not enough deep soils with high moisture holding capacity ( cotton, being basically a desert plant originally, doesn’t really like rain, but prefers to draw its water up through its roots )
 
too cold, too short a summer growing season, too humid, not enough deep soils with high moisture holding capacity ( cotton, being basically a desert plant originally, doesn’t really like rain, but prefers to draw its water up through its roots )
There is supposed to be only one cotton grower in the whole of France and he sells everything he produces via a website.

It's 50 euros for T shirt or 120 for a polo shirt.................!!

 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
Have you ever come across Myamba Farming near Towoomba, he moved farms and changed business name now I think. I worked for them maybe a year or 2 before the round modules came in, it was all boll buggies and module builders

yeah, no, sorry, don’t know of them.

my involvement with cotton dates back to the early 90’s & 2 row pickers, before boll buggies . . .
 

Ben B

Member
Mixed Farmer
What's the difference between a picker and a stripper? I understand there is a difference in the method of collecting the cotton bols of the plant but what is the benefits or minis of both types of machines?
 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
What's the difference between a picker and a stripper? I understand there is a difference in the method of collecting the cotton bols of the plant but what is the benefits or minis of both types of machines?

very basically, pickers are better suited to high yielding irrigated crops & strippers are better suited to dryland crops.
Also, in an Australian scenario, strippers are easier to extend out to 12 metres wide for skip row dryland crops

a stripper will harvest a higher yield than a picker, in the same crop, but in theory a picker will have a higher turnout of cotton lint after ginning . . .
Although that is now up for debate as we were getting very high turnouts from the strippers


stripper heads are a lot lower maintenance than picker heads & don’t require a constant source of water & grease
 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
What's the difference between a picker and a stripper? I understand there is a difference in the method of collecting the cotton bols of the plant but what is the benefits or minis of both types of machines?

a picker has rotating serrated spindles, that literally “pluck” the cotton from the bush. It can leave quite a bit behind, “tagging”, but what it does pick is generally the best quality fibre & is clean & free of trash

a stripper has rotating brushes that “strip” everything off the bush, ALL the cotton lint, including short & weak fibres, but also any leaf or green bolls or anything else on the bush, so quite a bit of trash as well. But, strippers do have a mini gin on board which cleans a lot of trash out before it goes into the accumulator then bale chamber
 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
The only cotton harvesting machinery available here is John Deere. They make both strippers & pickers, equivalent machines but for different applications. Either one is worth close to $1million Oz

Current models are CP690 ( cotton picker ) or CS690 ( cotton stripper )
They run 500 hp engines & make JD S780 headers ( combines ) look like Tonka Toys
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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