Tine drills, Which ones would you recommend? And the ones to avoid

Birchfarmer

Member
Thinking of purchasing a tine drill, to speed up my drilling time ( combination drilling at the moment)
maiinly ploughing, but a bit of min till on the few seasons it dry enough.
must be able to drill beans.
Second hand ideally.
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
I bought a Kuhn megant as it was what I could find In a hurry. I like it well enough. Really I wanted a KV TS, as my nearest good dealer is KV. I’ve seen a couple of TS in their yard since and think the weak points of the Megant look better on the KV🤷‍♂️.
Fast and not knocking the sh!t out of the soil like a power Harrow 👍
So what's your system now , no plough ?
 

Birchfarmer

Member
So what's your system now , no plough ?
Plough then combi drill, good but slower than it needs to be ( with other jobs to do in the time period)
average 30 acres a day ( 50 on a good day/ fields) but average is what matters
need 23 days to drill up out of 30 days
Farm not in ring fence,6 blocks
 

czechmate

Member
Mixed Farmer
Plough then combi drill, good but slower than it needs to be ( with other jobs to do in the time period)
average 30 acres a day ( 50 on a good day/ fields) but average is what matters
need 23 days to drill up out of 30 days
Farm not in ring fence,6 blocks

My megant is 4.8. 5 runs to a 24 M tramline, no half widths by the hedges, folds up narrow and fast. Fully mounted so a bit heavy when full. It came with very few rows, so wide widths which was a disaster but now on normal spacing I think it’s great. Kuhn Seeder calibration is very easy and accurate - (i had the same seeder for years before on a SD
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
My megant is 4.8. 5 runs to a 24 M tramline, no half widths by the hedges, folds up narrow and fast. Fully mounted so a bit heavy when full. It came with very few rows, so wide widths which was a disaster but now on normal spacing I think it’s great. Kuhn Seeder calibration is very easy and accurate - (i had the same seeder for years before on a SD
This yours

1644176518987.png
 

GOODYSMATE

Member
Location
suffolk
I bought a second hand KV,TS 4 meter last year to speed up drilling ,still got my combination if needed , TS is well made and can fold it up in seconds to run back to farm to get more seed as i am on my own it save running second tractor/trailer out to fields on the local bits . Run it on some ploughed and pressed land and on the bits we just run the Pluton though the stubble/chopped straw has passed though it ok so far ,really pleased with it ,i was looking for a 4 meter weaving as 2 of my neighbours have them and get on fine with them ,after i bought the TS last year 2 weaving drills came up for sale but like i said i am really happy with the TS,
 

E_B

Member
Location
Norfolk
PXL_20211213_124547480.jpg


A KV TS Evo has been a good machine to have here. Did everything with it at one point, from grass to beans. 5 rows of coulters means the trash clearance is pretty good. Have updated the metering to electric. Press wheels on the back suit us generally but have unsurprisingly blocked on wet clay. Don't think its lost any value in a decade.
 

nxy

Member
Mixed Farmer
I had one of the original Kverneland Tine Seeders from new for 7 years. It was worked pretty hard and it did the job but in the end I was glad to see it go. The biggest problem was the wheels being to small to support the weight of the drill. The original four tyres were shockingly awful we had daily punctures and by the end of the season all four wheel and tyres were replaced by kverneland at their expense. None of the wheels were round any more after one season because you can't see the tyres from the cab. The next four tyres were several ply ratings higher and lasted OK but punctures were a constant problem, it was just weekly after that not daily. The other problem was that it was bought as a wet weather drill but would sink in wet patches because the tyres were so small.

It was pretty heavy and it did bring up stones but was at least cheap to run. The last straw was that it needed quite a bit of welding at 7 years old so it got sold. I should point out it was 5m wide and drilling 7-800 per annum acres on 180Hp tractor at speed so we were probably a bit cruel to it.

The later Evo models look better built and has bigger tyres but I would avoid the first generation.
 

czechmate

Member
Mixed Farmer
I had one of the original Kverneland Tine Seeders from new for 7 years. It was worked pretty hard and it did the job but in the end I was glad to see it go. The biggest problem was the wheels being to small to support the weight of the drill. The original four tyres were shockingly awful we had daily punctures and by the end of the season all four wheel and tyres were replaced by kverneland at their expense. None of the wheels were round any more after one season because you can't see the tyres from the cab. The next four tyres were several ply ratings higher and lasted OK but punctures were a constant problem, it was just weekly after that not daily. The other problem was that it was bought as a wet weather drill but would sink in wet patches because the tyres were so small.

It was pretty heavy and it did bring up stones but was at least cheap to run. The last straw was that it needed quite a bit of welding at 7 years old so it got sold. I should point out it was 5m wide and drilling 7-800 per annum acres on 180Hp tractor at speed so we were probably a bit cruel to it.

The later Evo models look better built and has bigger tyres but I would avoid the first generation.

reading the first half of your post I was thinking your tractor must have been way too small. I’ve done the beat part of a season with a puncture, just holding the weight on the tractor
 

Alistair Nelson

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
E Yorks
I had one of the original Kverneland Tine Seeders from new for 7 years. It was worked pretty hard and it did the job but in the end I was glad to see it go. The biggest problem was the wheels being to small to support the weight of the drill. The original four tyres were shockingly awful we had daily punctures and by the end of the season all four wheel and tyres were replaced by kverneland at their expense. None of the wheels were round any more after one season because you can't see the tyres from the cab. The next four tyres were several ply ratings higher and lasted OK but punctures were a constant problem, it was just weekly after that not daily. The other problem was that it was bought as a wet weather drill but would sink in wet patches because the tyres were so small.

It was pretty heavy and it did bring up stones but was at least cheap to run. The last straw was that it needed quite a bit of welding at 7 years old so it got sold. I should point out it was 5m wide and drilling 7-800 per annum acres on 180Hp tractor at speed so we were probably a bit cruel to it.

The later Evo models look better built and has bigger tyres but I would avoid the first generation.
Million dollar question what do you run its place was it your only drill or wet weather fire engine drill?
 

nxy

Member
Mixed Farmer
reading the first half of your post I was thinking your tractor must have been way too small. I’ve done the beat part of a season with a puncture, just holding the weight on the tractor
Sorry it was the drill tyres I am talking about they were something like 12 inch wheels and no where near man enough for the job.
 

Is Red tractor detrimental to your mental health?

  • Yes, Red tractor increase my stress and anxiety

    Votes: 310 97.2%
  • No, Red tractor gives me peace of mind that the product I produce is safe to enter the food chain

    Votes: 9 2.8%

HSENI names new farm safety champions

  • 156
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
Top