Winter or spring barley?

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
So how are you going to vary your rotation to include the percentage of spring crops that are apparently required for DD to work successfully?


Allegedly.
I don’t get where that has come from to be honest.
lots of spring cropping here for the last 6 years has now created spring germinating blackgrass.
Spring barley seems to be the one crop which we struggle with some years in DD, everything else yields the same or better.
 

Phil P

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North West
So how are you going to vary your rotation to include the percentage of spring crops that are apparently required for DD to work successfully?


Allegedly.
We’re not direct drilling but get some cracking cover crops between harvesting and drilling winter barley.
FF42AF00-C364-4490-BB15-9C77E9CB259A.jpeg


As for the OP’s question, on a good year spring barley will hands down have the best margin and can yield as much as winter barley. However on a bad year it will take money with it! If winter barley gets a good establishment it will be a far more consistent yield year on year.
 

DaveGrohl

Member
Location
Cumbria
We’re not direct drilling but get some cracking cover crops between harvesting and drilling winter barley.
View attachment 1034021

As for the OP’s question, on a good year spring barley will hands down have the best margin and can yield as much as winter barley. However on a bad year it will take money with it! If winter barley gets a good establishment it will be a far more consistent yield year on year.
What operation are you doing there? Straight in with a power harrow through an unsprayed cover crop?
 

Phil P

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North West
What operation are you doing there? Straight in with a power harrow through an unsprayed cover crop?
Chopping it with the short discs, plough it in then combi drill, some ground we do spray it off chop it then straight in with the drill though.
With the price of glypho at the moment there’s not much difference between a pass with the sprayer and a pass with the plough 😂
 

DaveGrohl

Member
Location
Cumbria
Chopping it with the short discs, plough it in then combi drill, some ground we do spray it off chop it then straight in with the drill though.
With the price of glypho at the moment there’s not much difference between a pass with the sprayer and a pass with the plough 😂
Not criticising but that seems a lot of operations to this backward mixed farmer. We’re constantly being told that ploughing and combi drilling will undoubtedly bring about the end of civilisation by 2050. It brought about consistent excellent crops here but what do I know. We’re edging away from the plough and are experimenting with tined cultivator instead of ploughing of stubble (looking ok as a policy in our 2nd year of it). One experimental field direct drilled with a Claydon was just comical in its lack of any noticeable crop.

To see someone doing an extra operation on top of the evil plough has come as a surprise. I’m fascinated as to how you guys growing these bulky cover crops deal with the bulk. (can I stress I’m not criticising again btw). You’ve obv found that a plough as a middle operation is necessary but to me that looks as if your short discs are doing a terrific job of dealing with the cover. I’d be happy to go in with the combi drill looking at that. Presumably, the dark colour of the soil is hiding a lot of material which becomes apparent when you drill?
 

Phil P

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North West
Not criticising but that seems a lot of operations to this backward mixed farmer. We’re constantly being told that ploughing and combi drilling will undoubtedly bring about the end of civilisation by 2050. It brought about consistent excellent crops here but what do I know. We’re edging away from the plough and are experimenting with tined cultivator instead of ploughing of stubble (looking ok as a policy in our 2nd year of it). One experimental field direct drilled with a Claydon was just comical in its lack of any noticeable crop.

To see someone doing an extra operation on top of the evil plough has come as a surprise. I’m fascinated as to how you guys growing these bulky cover crops deal with the bulk. (can I stress I’m not criticising again btw). You’ve obv found that a plough as a middle operation is necessary but to me that looks as if your short discs are doing a terrific job of dealing with the cover. I’d be happy to go in with the combi drill looking at that. Presumably, the dark colour of the soil is hiding a lot of material which becomes apparent when you drill?
Generally we will have a crop established with no more than 3 passes maximum (personally I would have just drilled into that as well but I have to keep the old boy happy who loves a bit of ploughing 🙄). Some ground we just go with a one pass cultivator then drill and maybe plough one in 3 years maybe. The cultivator doesn’t like a lot of trash so can’t go straight into a cover crop with it! It took some time to get the old boy away from working stubbles then another pass before the plough then powerharrow before the combi 🤦🏻‍♂️ So, on the grand scheme we now have a pretty efficient system in comparison 😂.
I don’t care what anyone says, some ground doesn’t suit direct drilling! However chopping straw and cover crops are definitely improving it.
 

DaveGrohl

Member
Location
Cumbria
Generally we will have a crop established with no more than 3 passes maximum (personally I would have just drilled into that as well but I have to keep the old boy happy who loves a bit of ploughing 🙄). Some ground we just go with a one pass cultivator then drill and maybe plough one in 3 years maybe. The cultivator doesn’t like a lot of trash so can’t go straight into a cover crop with it! It took some time to get the old boy away from working stubbles then another pass before the plough then powerharrow before the combi 🤦🏻‍♂️ So, on the grand scheme we now have a pretty efficient system in comparison 😂.
I don’t care what anyone says, some ground doesn’t suit direct drilling! However chopping straw and cover crops are definitely improving it.
For the sake of clarity, when you say combi drill are you talking about a drill mounted on top of a powerharrow? That’s what rednecks like me understand by combidrill.
 

Adeptandy

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
PE15
We’re not direct drilling but get some cracking cover crops between harvesting and drilling winter barley.
View attachment 1034021

As for the OP’s question, on a good year spring barley will hands down have the best margin and can yield as much as winter barley. However on a bad year it will take money with it! If winter barley gets a good establishment it will be a far more consistent yield year on year.
Looks a nice cover, what’s in it ?
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
If you are growing SBly for BG control FFS drill in April, and don't bother with a pre em.

I said years ago that BG will select for spring germination during a run of spring crops. The concept was poo pooed at the time but I have since been proved correct. BG will never be resistant to steel and diesel though.
 

D14

Member
If you are growing SBly for BG control FFS drill in April, and don't bother with a pre em.

I said years ago that BG will select for spring germination during a run of spring crops. The concept was poo pooed at the time but I have since been proved correct. BG will never be resistant to steel and diesel though.

It kind of is because we have laughed ryegrass down only to bring some ups from below at the same time. The only way steel would beat is it you ran a shallow cultivator every time you have a germination of grass weeds which would mean not actually planting a crop in that year.
 

Make Tax Digital Software Poll

  • Quickbooks

    Votes: 34 16.6%
  • Sage

    Votes: 20 9.8%
  • Xero

    Votes: 95 46.3%
  • Other

    Votes: 56 27.3%

Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

  • 240
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
Top