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we'll agree to disagree then. Got better things to do
Op ,why dont you hog ring net up against your barb wire. ? As being possibly the quickest solution, it's not double fence I know, which sounds to me like whats needed in the situation.
Thats probably the answer but will have to remove barb to stop heads getting trapped.
just another job these keep sheep have made, Ill say it again they should fence there own sheep on there own land, our fence is NOT the boundary.
Said field was originally fenced like this as it had horses on it and the worry about feet in net.
Not my land not my sheep, we are just long standing suffering contract shepherds.
 

Guiggs

Member
Location
Leicestershire
It strikes me theres 2 issues with the fencing here, sheep need netting to keep them in not just barb wire so I'm afraid your 5 strands aren't suitable for the job but...
It's the sheep owner/ keepers job to fence his stock in not his neighbours job to fence them out, as such the owner of the other sheep should have his own fence of stock netting and a strand or 2 of barb
 
we'll agree to disagree then. Got better things to do

Thats probably the answer but will have to remove barb to stop heads getting trapped.
just another job these keep sheep have made, Ill say it again they should fence there own sheep on there own land, our fence is NOT the boundary.
Said field was originally fenced like this as it had horses on it and the worry about feet in net.
Not my land not my sheep, we are just long standing suffering contract shepherds.
Dearer but what about Horse net
 
We all have a bit of this. Last year I put 100 ewes and their rams in a field electric fenced in. Three days later neighbour to land put 50 ewes next door behind a 1ft high crumbled wall. All the ewes came over the wall and paraded uo and down the electric fence line until the inevitable happened and the rams got through and did their business. He had a face like thunder and wanted me to pay for jabs for his ewes. I had to tell him to go forth and multiply. He moved the ewes and then moaned every time he saw me that they were eaten up and they needed moving back next to mine. I told him I would sell him some hay for them......
 

Goweresque

Member
Location
North Wilts
It strikes me theres 2 issues with the fencing here, sheep need netting to keep them in not just barb wire so I'm afraid your 5 strands aren't suitable for the job but...
It's the sheep owner/ keepers job to fence his stock in not his neighbours job to fence them out, as such the owner of the other sheep should have his own fence of stock netting and a strand or 2 of barb
This. Both parties are at fault, the neighbour for not having any fencing at all, and the OP for not having fully sheep proof fencing. If this was just about 'I'm not happy at the biosecurity implications of the neighbours sheep touching mine through my fence' then I'd fall 100% on the side of the OP, but as his sheep have escaped through his fence as well, he's got to share some degree of culpability for that. Livestock fencing needs to be suitable for all eventualities, not just the best case one.
 
This. Both parties are at fault, the neighbour for not having any fencing at all, and the OP for not having fully sheep proof fencing. If this was just about 'I'm not happy at the biosecurity implications of the neighbours sheep touching mine through my fence' then I'd fall 100% on the side of the OP, but as his sheep have escaped through his fence as well, he's got to share some degree of culpability for that. Livestock fencing needs to be suitable for all eventualities, not just the best case one.
Agree with this. Sheep on tack can be a nightmare. Scab and lice are off the clock now
 
Theres fences and theres fences. I bet this 5 strains is a lot more stock proof than some old wanky netting.
What if mine were on electric behind the barb wire? Still ok for his to come to my boundary?or do I need to add yet another buffer and fence out in the field? So his are technically trespassing and it would still be wrong that my that the rams got over electric and my so called poor fencing.
Had this before on keep and decency dictated that who was there 1st kept there sheep to that boundary 1st if on electric etc
 

Goweresque

Member
Location
North Wilts
Theres fences and theres fences. I bet this 5 strains is a lot more stock proof than some old wanky netting.
And if someone's rams get out through their manky netting then they are at fault too.

What if mine were on electric behind the barb wire? Still ok for his to come to my boundary?
No, his sheep are trespassing.

So his are technically trespassing and it would still be wrong that my that the rams got over electric and my so called poor fencing.
Your fence needs to be good enough to keep your sheep in regardless of what happens on the other side of it. I can't think that your rams would have been any less desperate to get out if the neighbour's ewes were a couple of metres away behind a few strands of electric, rather than right up to your barbed wire fence.
 

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Industry-wide ruminant group to tackle endemic diseases across the UK

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Written by John Swire

A new UK-wide cattle and sheep industry group is to be created to speed up progress against endemic diseases and reputational challenges which are costing the cattle and sheep sectors at least £500 million per year.

An industry consultation* on creating the new group had a strong majority supporting the move in principle, with many believing it will accelerate work to...
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