Aortic dilation (aneurysm)

two-cylinder

Member
Location
Cambridge
Recently received the shock diagnosis of an ascending aortic dilation (aneurysm), found whilst looking for something else.:oops:
Has anyone any experience of this?
If so was you given any limitations on activity?
Online advice is inconsistent.
I am in limbo having not yet seen a cardiologist to discuss? and obviously don't want it to burst given survival is 20% :(
 
Had the routine scan at 65 and was aok. Sorry to hear your problem but it is serious, a friends wife 53 died of that but was mostly self inflicted with drink the main cause of most of the problems which then culminated in the aortic artery failure. Go private if you can't get NHS to move fast.
 

Netherfield

Member
Location
West Yorkshire
That's what did for my dad aged 95, But don't panic too soon, he found out 17 years previous and was monitored twice a year, the specialist said it didn't change for much like 15 years, no telling how long it's been there he said and could have been from a young man

It was only the last couple when it seemed to change, even when first spotted they didn't recommend surgery, I was with him at the time and we were told "I'm more likely to kill you before this thing does".
 

two-cylinder

Member
Location
Cambridge
I'm in my early 50's, and everyone else I hear about: who had it at my age- didn't know and died suddenly from it.
I'm yet to hear of anyone else in my age group whose aneurysm was found early and treated successfully?
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
A local plumber was diagnosed by a good GP here maybe forty years ago now. He went in complaining of an arm aching. Went straight in to hospital and it was confirmed and he had an emergency operation next day. He lived for at least a couple of decades after in good health.

Most people just drop stone dead in seconds when it bursts.
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
If you feel unwell then time is of the essence.
The farm steward here was found slumped over the steering wheel of his tractor with a weeping aorta in his late 60’s. He was blue lighted an hour up the road to hospital and operated on immediately before being patched up with a piece of Goretex. His survival was down to the vigilance of another driver on the other side of the field who had worked with him for years, and who thought it odd that he’d stopped for a few minutes without getting out of the cab. It gave his friend and neighbour another 20 full years of life.
 

wrenbird

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
HR2
I know of two people who where operated on successfully and lived for many good years after, the one gentleman is still alive at the age of 97!
My Grandad was not so lucky, when he suffered a ruptured aorta they did considered operating, but he was so weak and ill from other health problems that there was no chance of him surviving such major surgery.
 
I know 2 people who had sucessful operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Both of them became aware of the aneurysm, because it caused a very noticeable "pulse" beat in their lower abdomen. After regular scans to monitor the size, they were both operated on, recovered and lived for a long while after.
 

two-cylinder

Member
Location
Cambridge
I know of two people who where operated on successfully and lived for many good years after, the one gentleman is still alive at the age of 97!
My Grandad was not so lucky, when he suffered a ruptured aorta they did considered operating, but he was so weak and ill from other health problems that there was no chance of him surviving such major surgery.
Sorry to hear about your Grandad.
I also have experience of ruptures because both my father's brother and my mother's sister died following thoracic Aorta ruptures when repair surgery failed.
Having connections on both sides of my family, I am keen to get this sorted asap, and in the meantime try and prevent myself being the third victim of this not so common ailment.
 

wrenbird

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
HR2
Sorry to hear about your Grandad.
I also have experience of ruptures because both my father's brother and my mother's sister died following thoracic Aorta ruptures when repair surgery failed.
Having connections on both sides of my family, I am keen to get this sorted asap, and in the meantime try and prevent myself being the third victim of this not so common ailment.
Thank you, but Grandad was many years ago, I’m sure that medical science has advanced a great deal in the meantime. Indeed the other serious health problems he had been living with for many years before he died would be far more easily treated these days.
You are relatively young, and, although the diagnosis must have been a shock, at least the problem has been found, and, with your hospital appointment arranged, you will soon be in the care of those best able to see you through this.
 
Not uncommon but as with most things this is something that comes in a range of sizes. It is true that some need prompt attention but many are nothing like as extreme. The aorta is a complex beast and copes with the pulse from your heart day in and day out so it is ok to put some faith in it.

I don't know as I've never investigated it but I suspect there may be some patients who have theirs repaired using endovascular techniques, i.e catheter is used to place a stent with the entry point being one of the blood vessels in your leg. If they can stent the coronary arteries in your heart this way then I can't see why an aorta couldn't be done similarly. Point is it would be a much quicker and far simpler procedure.
 

5020man

Member
Hi
I always thought stents were for opening narowed arteries to increase blood flow.
Aortic aneurysms are weak points (bulges) and need to be supported with a gaiter
to stop it rupturing
6 years ago I had right carotid artery endarterectomy to clear a 98% blockage
Afterwards I was told 30mm patch was fitted to support the opening in the artery
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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