Blood sucking ahdb

I said a number of times that myself and my neighbour have paid 800,000 pounds into the ahdb in the last ten years for no benefit whatsoever,if you look at the last set of accounts we have a farmers wife (Christine watts)who was paid £150.000 for one of the less important jobs I should think her husband has worked out that it beats farming by some margin especially this year ,our poll will be coming out to the horticultural sector in two weeks I hope it is more supported than the defra poll which only received less than half a percent (0.354) replies ,that's because it was kept under the radar, nonetheless Jayne king has said she has a clear mandate to carry on charging for a service we do not want even Robert murgarbe would have been embarrassed by the turnout,but when you start drilling down into the ahdb you find you are also fighting the establishment
 
Looking through the accounts it appears that only a fraction of our levy is actually spent the rest is in reserve which could be in a deposit account so we are giving our money away free for the ahdb to earn interest and put in the pension fund ,like psq quoted nice work if you can get it
 

Smith31

Member
You think? Is that why Apple are so unprofitable, what with them having advertising and image so good but charging a premium price over the market? Or, closer to home, Dyson?

Advertising works, and that's why we have brands.

Apple and Dyson create quality, reliable products, hence the reason they command a premium. This is the same reason why folk pay a premium for Volvo over Daf and Fendt over Massey.

Meat is meat to consumers, the housewife who has a budget of £50 for her weekly shop will not choose prime, organic grass fed beef if she can not afford it, regardless of advertising.

Furthermore, Apple products are seen as a status symbols, meat is not. When was the last time you saw a selfie with a teenager holding an ox tail on social media? Yet the web is full of Apple product selfies.

Barbecue sauce, pepper, Bombay mix, salt, tinned tomatoes, peaches, grated cheese etc are not advertised yet they still sell well, why should meat be an exemption? Farmers should have an option to opt out of levy payments.
 
Just think I could have installed quite a chunk of solar panels for 300 k ten years ago then I would not be complaining about the ahdb because the returns would mean I could forget about growing cheap veg rent the land out and let all the other growers deal with organisations riding on the back of growers ,all we can hope is our ballot gets the required result and rid ourselves of these useless,wasteful outfits.
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
Apple and Dyson create quality, reliable products, hence the reason they command a premium. This is the same reason why folk pay a premium for Volvo over Daf and Fendt over Massey.

Actually, they're largely style over substance - I have both and they are no more reliable or effective than the competitors. It's advertising that allows them to charge a premium.

Meat is meat to consumers, the housewife who has a budget of £50 for her weekly shop will not choose prime, organic grass fed beef if she can not afford it, regardless of advertising.

Again, not true. A householder will prioritise spend as they see fit and can be convinced to shift spend by the correct branding and advertising. Have you heard of Donald Russell or Simon Howie?

Furthermore, Apple products are seen as a status symbols, meat is not. When was the last time you saw a selfie with a teenager holding an ox tail on social media? Yet the web is full of Apple product selfies.

Come on - that was what Twitter was famous for when it started - folks showing photos of their dinner plates.

Barbecue sauce, pepper, Bombay mix, salt, tinned tomatoes, peaches, grated cheese etc are not advertised yet they still sell well, why should meat be an exemption? Farmers should have an option to opt out of levy payments.

"The man from del monte"
"We don't make cereals for anyone else"
"57 varieties"
....
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Apple and Dyson create quality, reliable products, hence the reason they command a premium. This is the same reason why folk pay a premium for Volvo over Daf and Fendt over Massey.

Meat is meat to consumers, the housewife who has a budget of £50 for her weekly shop will not choose prime, organic grass fed beef if she can not afford it, regardless of advertising.

Furthermore, Apple products are seen as a status symbols, meat is not. When was the last time you saw a selfie with a teenager holding an ox tail on social media? Yet the web is full of Apple product selfies.

Barbecue sauce, pepper, Bombay mix, salt, tinned tomatoes, peaches, grated cheese etc are not advertised yet they still sell well, why should meat be an exemption? Farmers should have an option to opt out of levy payments.


Think you've been living under a rock.
Every product under the sun is advertised.


"Peugeot, the drive of your life"
"The car in front, is a Toyota"
"Ello Tosh, gotta Toshiba?"
"You know when you've been Tango'd"
"Opal Fruits made to make your mouth water"
"A Mars a day helps you work, rest and play"
"I'm Lovin' It"
"Land Rover - the best 4x4xfar"
"reggae reggae sauce"
"Pepperami, its a bit of an animal"
"Strings and Things"
"Baby Bell"
"Make Young's the fish of the day"
"Have you had your Weetabix?"


And those are just off the top of my head. Advertising is huge and very influential.
Apple and Fendt are perceived to be the best through exceptional marketing. They are no better than their competitors, but they did the leg work and now reap their rewards.
 

Smith31

Member
Think you've been living under a rock.
Every product under the sun is advertised.


"Peugeot, the drive of your life"
"The car in front, is a Toyota"
"Ello Tosh, gotta Toshiba?"
"You know when you've been Tango'd"
"Opal Fruits made to make your mouth water"
"A Mars a day helps you work, rest and play"
"I'm Lovin' It"
"Land Rover - the best 4x4xfar"
"reggae reggae sauce"
"Pepperami, its a bit of an animal"
"Strings and Things"
"Baby Bell"
"Make Young's the fish of the day"
"Have you had your Weetabix?"


And those are just off the top of my head. Advertising is huge and very influential.
Apple and Fendt are perceived to be the best through exceptional marketing. They are no better than their competitors, but they did the leg work and now reap their rewards.

You're welcome to pay my levies and reap the rewards from advertising. If you could kindly send me your bank details, I will set up a standing order.

Most of our lamb is exported, we as a farming business are being bent over for no reason, as are most other farmers who produce export quality lamb and beef.

I am sure the vast majority of farmers would opt out if their was an option.
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
You're welcome to pay my levies and reap the rewards from advertising. If you could kindly send me your bank details, I will set up a standing order.

Most of our lamb is exported, we as a farming business are being bent over for no reason, as are most other farmers who produce export quality lamb and beef.

I am sure the vast majority of farmers would opt out if their was an option.
ahdb advertise British lamb in France
 

kmo

Member
Location
E. Wales
as levy payers we are crying out for advertising , why don't they do it? Why do tesco asda etc spend a fortune if it dosnt pay?
AHDB are currently advertising on 5 USA "sponsoring drama". PGI Scotch beef, PGI welsh beef and Red Tractor. PGI is mentioned a lot. I can't remember what PGI means, so how would a consumer know?
 

Smith31

Member
ahdb advertise British lamb in France

Ours goes to Belgium, the reason why our lamb is purchased there is not because of AHDB but because we provide an excellent product at a lower cost.

Like I have said you are all free to contribute to AHDB, but thousands of farmers would rather not and would instead use the savings to improve their farms and stock.
 

New report underlines need for joined-up action to protect rivers

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New report underlines need for joined-up action to protect rivers

Written by Defra Press Office

A wide river is in view in a valley in the background, a drystone wall is behind the river, and large, green trees are prominent in the scene.


The Rivers Trust has today launched its State of Our Rivers report aiming to allow the English public understand and explore the health of their rivers on a national and local scale.

Environment Minister Rebecca Pow and Environment Agency Director John Leyland attended the launch panel to discuss the ways in which the...
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