Direct Drilling After Root Crop

Thefarmingpilot

Member
Mixed Farmer
Good Afternoon all

I’m wondering what everyone’s opinion is on DD after a root crop?

We have Sugar Beer planned currently, but trying to plan the crop after.

Any thoughts or suggestions?
 

EddieB

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Staffs
It really depends on when the beet crop is harvested and how good the weather is at harvest. I have managed it successfully in the early autumn but the opportunity doesn't always arise.
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
What kind of DD? A few strip tillers getting good results but that's a leg ripping surface compaction up.

You won't really know what the timing or conditions will be unless you have a very good control of when they lift it.
 

Wombat

Member
Location
East yorks
I agree about the Claydon, but don't belive the hype about Tritons. A floating coulter assembly might help if drilling with the wheelings to help with seed depth.
Really depends on what the grounds like after, I have gone in straight after fodder beet that was lifted reasonably tidy with our old Mf30 at 300kg/ha and eased past 4t/a

There are other times you wouldn’t get 400kg/a if it’s a mess
 

alomy75

Member
Good Afternoon all

I’m wondering what everyone’s opinion is on DD after a root crop?

We have Sugar Beer planned currently, but trying to plan the crop after.

Any thoughts or suggestions?
If you’re new to beet don’t forget the ongoing rotational restrictions if you have neonic seed
 

farmerfred86

Member
BASIS
Location
Suffolk
We now DD after sugarbeet come hell or high water. The MAUS usually creates an impassable disaster zone though.
In a dry year a disc drill is ok but the claydon now seems the perfect tool for this. We switched to the claydon because we needed the drainage channel to remove excess water and keep the seeds on the banks. (Wheat seeds drowned last year)
The soil is usually much softer for rooting (even after the harvester) and the cost and extra compaction from a plough/min till cultivation don't add to the margin even if the crop looks better. For me anyway.
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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