Farm Security - Gate Locks ?

NewFarm

Member
We had a break in last night, thankfully only loosing some easily replaced tools, chainsaws etc.

Our gates were locked with large security chain and padlock, which was easily cut with large bolt cutters.

I'm acutely aware 'they' will be back, and whilst I doubt I'll be able to prevent another visit, I need to make the gates as hard to open as possible.

Does anyone have any inspiration / solutions for locking gates, in particular when the availability of large bolt cutters make heavy chain and ineffective.
 

bumkin

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
pembrokeshire
security depends on how far you live from the site, geese are a first-class deterrent as they make so much noise also a good dog with a bed in the shed, it doesn't matter how you lock or chain the gates and doors they will always break in if they can do it quietly and no one about the police are about as much use as an ashtray on a motorbike in these cases
 
Location
Ireland
Don't lock ur gate's,, that's y they think u have stuff,,
They will be back very shortly,, stay in the shed for few nites ,, and fire a few shots at them, take there transport out of it first ,, they not be back after that,
 

holwellcourtfarm

Member
NFFN Member
You can create a closed in box that shields the padlock so bolt croppers and angle grinders can't reach it. Admittedly with cordless grinders anything metal can be defeated eventually, but if you build it of heavy enough steel they'll probably run out of batteries before cutting through.
They'll probably target the gate itself then as the weakest point.

BBC ran a piece this week saying that under 5% of household burglaries are even investigated now and that without either good quality forensic evidence or a good quality cctv image most police forces just issue a crime number. Farm break-ins are probably similar and the criminals know it.

Our laws are fine, it's the implementation that's lacking. Without enforcement of the law there's no such thing as security.
 

steveR

Member
Mixed Farmer
Lock the farm gates, lock the shed doors. Lock all man-portable tools away in a strong room. Hide stuff out of sight, including fuel tanks, quads and the like. The more hassle it is to get near stuff the less grief you will have.

Shotgun cartridge trip alarms are cheap just make sure they don't scare the hell out of you one morning.

I would not rely on a single dog, would have 2 or 3 on the premises. Ones that bark. A lot.
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
Have you got any alarms fitted? The more the better.

They will more than likely be back to nick the new stuff. Perhaps keep it in the house or in hidden away places for a few months, I know its hassle but that is what one has to do.
 

holwellcourtfarm

Member
NFFN Member
Lock the farm gates, lock the shed doors. Lock all man-portable tools away in a strong room. Hide stuff out of sight, including fuel tanks, quads and the like. The more hassle it is to get near stuff the less grief you will have.

Shotgun cartridge trip alarms are cheap just make sure they don't scare the hell out of you one morning.

I would not rely on a single dog, would have 2 or 3 on the premises. Ones that bark. A lot.
Dogs risk getting poisoned or shoot with crossbows from the hardcore thieves these days :mad:

Add above: a decent "Redwall" type infrared beam perimeter alarm will let you know when they arrive. Decent concealed still cameras will then give you good quality images. With that you can insist the police act.
 

GeorgeK

Member
Location
Leicestershire
Unless they are disturbed more physical security often means they will just cause more damage getting in or bypass it. A strong gate's not much good if they can come through the fields or fence. A shed is only as secure as the weakest part of the wall or roof. Don't underestimate them, if you lost the key how would you get in? They are just as capable and resourceful and will happily commandeer your own tools and machines to get the job done.
Beam alarm and let them know they have been spotted (but don't engage) is best. Keep the nice tools in the house, they're not safe in sheds unfortunately.
 

Bramble

Member
Parabeam beam system - alerts you when the beam is broken and the 12v outputs can be used to trigger all sorts of things lights/sirens/cameras etc etc. Add in a delay switch and they won’t even know if they’ve triggered an alarm if beam points are hidden.

I expect cheaper ones are available as well
 

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
It infuriates me that thieves (scum of the earth)are on the increase, and that 21st technology has not come up with a simple inexpensive system that defeats them.
All this bravado crap talk about shooting them on TFF is just a load of crap talk, as we all know that in reality shooting criminals is unfortunately a crime. :banghead: :banghead: :rolleyes:
 

steveR

Member
Mixed Farmer
After our last break in and the mess they made of the roofs and cladding I don't lock the sheds any more. It was especially annoying where they caused damage breaking into buildings that didn't contain anything of value. Power tools/generator/quad live in the house or garage now.

Or just "hide" them in if you have some old buildings with crap and junk...
 
They'll probably target the gate itself then as the weakest point.

BBC ran a piece this week saying that under 5% of household burglaries are even investigated now and that without either good quality forensic evidence or a good quality cctv image most police forces just issue a crime number. Farm break-ins are probably similar and the criminals know it.

Our laws are fine, it's the implementation that's lacking. Without enforcement of the law there's no such thing as security.

I always wonder about people wanting new laws when the ones on the books, as you say, aren't even being enforced.
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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