Hip replacement- anyone had it done?

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
Wife had both done 18 months ago, the difference has been dramatic. We had both thought she would be in a wheelchair within 3 months . She is now showing no signs of any mobility issue. Go for it!
 

milkloss

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Sussex
I went back to see the surgeon and he suggested I get it done as soon as I can in the spring as it is not too painful at the mo, but it is best to get it done while you are still active.
Good. It also changes your gait/walking posture for the worse and is very difficult to ever get right again. Get it done, wish my Father had listened to advice.
 
I cant remember all the details Red Fred gave initially. Been learning a lot about elective surgeries. For a typical person having a hip/knee procedure you wont be in hospital long. A few days is typical. Main drawback is no driving for several weeks.

A 2 year wait is not uncommon from what I gather. Any pre-existing condition affecting your suitability for surgery may cause delays also.

Mobility and fitness before and after the procedure are important in speed of recovery. The bulk of procedures are carried out under spinal anaesthetic as its simpler and safer (probably cheaper) with fewer side effects.
 

JCMaloney

Member
Location
LE3 9EU
Mobility and fitness before and after the procedure are important in speed of recovery. The bulk of procedures are carried out under spinal anaesthetic as its simpler and safer (probably cheaper) with fewer side effects.
Spinal block is much,much safer than GA. The patient recovers much quicker and can be making the first move to mobility on the day of the op. Ergo they leave quicker, saves a fortune!
You`ll need a good "house nurse" to look after you for 3 or 4 days but after that its about building confidence in the new hip and letting the body repair.
Mrs M had hers done early August last year and we done the "Walk for Wards" 5k sponsored walk 6 weeks later. Admittedly she said that was pushing things a bit and it took a day or two to recover. (y)
 
Spinal block is much,much safer than GA. The patient recovers much quicker and can be making the first move to mobility on the day of the op. Ergo they leave quicker, saves a fortune!
You`ll need a good "house nurse" to look after you for 3 or 4 days but after that its about building confidence in the new hip and letting the body repair.
Mrs M had hers done early August last year and we done the "Walk for Wards" 5k sponsored walk 6 weeks later. Admittedly she said that was pushing things a bit and it took a day or two to recover. (y)
Yeah but spinal is a bit boring. Much prefer GA. Ive been in theatre this week.
 

puppet

Member
Location
sw scotland
I went back to see the surgeon and he suggested I get it done as soon as I can in the spring as it is not too painful at the mo, but it is best to get it done while you are still active.
Have you looked at the NHS sites about the reasons for the op? Mainly done for pain.
Constant pain which is affecting your mobility and daily activities. 10% are unhappy with the outcome. A revision is not an easy operation as only some surgeons will do it.
But if you have had enough of the pain you will have to decide
 
Have you looked at the NHS sites about the reasons for the op? Mainly done for pain.
Constant pain which is affecting your mobility and daily activities. 10% are unhappy with the outcome. A revision is not an easy operation as only some surgeons will do it.
But if you have had enough of the pain you will have to decide
People may reach a stage with this kind of osteo-arthritis where they are near wheelchair bound just from the pain. Being unable to stand up and walk has other consequences of its own as well. A hip or knee may reach a point where infection is involved.
I dont want to elaborate on all the gory possibilties but from what I have seen if it was me I would be the first one to hop on the table and a lot of people I have met have had to wait a long time because of other reasons.

My point is doing nothing might not be a realistic option for all. Ive met many many people with more than one replacement and none of them regretted it. There are risk attached to any surgery but also potential risks attached to not having it.

I would also be wary of taking serious pain killers long term.
 
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puppet

Member
Location
sw scotland
Joints don't get infected by osteoarthritis and I have not seen anyone get to wheelchair stage unless they were extremely frail and old so unfit for surgery. I have seen lots of replacements in another job and it should not be considered lightly although the majority of people are very pleased with the outcome.
NHS around here will explain you understand the risk of ongoing pain, infection, dislocation, amputation, stroke, pneumonia, thrombosis and heart attack. All low risks but the surgeon will have seen these complications
 

Old Shep

Member
My husband was advised almist 12 months ago that he needed both knees and both hips replacing. They would start with a knee. We were both worried about the operation, and the weekend before we went for a walk with the dogs. He scarpered up a steep hill leaving me standing and puffing. I challenged that he needed these ops, he cancelled. That was last year he's still doing motorbike trials! I think docs get carried away especially if they're private!!
 
Joints don't get infected by osteoarthritis and I have not seen anyone get to wheelchair stage unless they were extremely frail and old so unfit for surgery. I have seen lots of replacements in another job and it should not be considered lightly although the majority of people are very pleased with the outcome.
NHS around here will explain you understand the risk of ongoing pain, infection, dislocation, amputation, stroke, pneumonia, thrombosis and heart attack. All low risks but the surgeon will have seen these complications
I have met several people who were far from frail or properly elderly who were wheelchair bound with the pain.

Ive met people sub 50 years old who needed the replacement as their joint had disintegrated and was causing a lot of grief becoming wildly infected and so interfering with the circulation to that leg.

Each individual needs to weigh up their own decision though.
 

puppet

Member
Location
sw scotland
Ive met people sub 50 years old who needed the replacement as their joint had disintegrated and was causing a lot of grief becoming wildly infected and so interfering with the circulation to that leg.
Last comment from me is that is no infection from osteoarthritis but likely to be a septic arthritis (ie human joint ill).
 
I have met several people who were far from frail or properly elderly who were wheelchair bound with the pain.

Ive met people sub 50 years old who needed the replacement as their joint had disintegrated and was causing a lot of grief becoming wildly infected and so interfering with the circulation to that leg.

Each individual needs to weigh up their own decision though.
Your last sentence sums it up really.
If one knows or has met a person whose hip or knee op didnt go that well , one would have a somewhat more cautious view.
I would always insist on a second or more opinion.
Sometimes it almost seems like body parts are disposable now , "that old knee has been there 55 years now ,if your getting a bit of gip its time to replace it" , sort of thing.

Your body is the most fascinating machine you'll ever own. Look after it well because as a rule, replacement parts ,while readily available will not outperform the original.
 

JCMaloney

Member
Location
LE3 9EU
My husband was advised almist 12 months ago that he needed both knees and both hips replacing. They would start with a knee. We were both worried about the operation, and the weekend before we went for a walk with the dogs. He scarpered up a steep hill leaving me standing and puffing. I challenged that he needed these ops, he cancelled. That was last year he's still doing motorbike trials! I think docs get carried away especially if they're private!!
Wouldn`t argue with that, not to be confused with an NHS referral to a Private hospital for the operation though.
It`s actually "cheaper" for the NHS to refer work out than pay the CCG "fines" for missing targets, and its probably the same consultant doing the operation!The bonkers world in which we live!
 
Wouldn`t argue with that, not to be confused with an NHS referral to a Private hospital for the operation though.
It`s actually "cheaper" for the NHS to refer work out than pay the CCG "fines" for missing targets, and its probably the same consultant doing the operation!The bonkers world in which we live!
I was under the impression some trusts make a lot of money out of private work?
 

JCMaloney

Member
Location
LE3 9EU
I was under the impression some trusts make a lot of money out of private work?
I couldn`t possibly comment ! Suffice to say the rate paid to the local Private Provider could well be less than the nationally contracted payment received from the CCG and that could be interpreted as "profit". 🤔
 

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