"Improving Our Lot" - Planned Holistic Grazing, for starters..

Discussion in 'Holistic Farming' started by Kiwi Pete, Apr 21, 2018.

  1. Crofter64

    Crofter64 Member

    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    I was wondering about the paddock youwould like to re seed by leaving it to grow longer. If you graze it very lightly, the animals will get the benefit of it while it is very palatable, they will trample some, but a lot will continue growing and will reseed itself. That way when the cows return they will have three kinds of grass on offer. Or were you thinking of cutting it for hay once it has matured some more?
     
  2. Blaithin

    Blaithin Member

    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Ah, you look for 1/3 of the mass left behind that way then. I picture it as at least 1/3 of the plant left (really here they recommend more like 2/3) So if I picture the plant in my minds eye I divide it into thirds and when the cows eat the top third they're done. I seen a really good illustration of this with the bottom third being for the plant and soil, the middle third for wildlife and the top for livestock. Of course they don't divvy it up this perfectly but it was a good image to save in my mind for later. Especially when you have grasses that don't grow as tall. What Timothy and Brome can handle as a third would be the entire wheatgrass plant!

    If done by mass then you're still liable to have areas eaten right down and the areas around the pats and where they bed constituting the third of the field left.
     
  3. Karliboy

    Karliboy Member

    Location:
    West Yorkshire

    Sorry yes I am cutting this for hay/haylage hopefully.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
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  4. Karliboy

    Karliboy Member

    Location:
    West Yorkshire


    That’s my problem with this way off grazing is how much of a mess it looks with clumps of grass here and there and flattened down where the cattle have laid on it and not eaten any.
    But I’m hoping using this method of grazing I will start to think how well it looks in that state and the benefits will come from it.
     
  5. Treg

    Treg Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Yes you are right it should be 1/3 plant left(y) me & the cows need more training to get it right:oops: :D
     
  6. Blaithin

    Blaithin Member

    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    I wish they listened when I tell them to only eat the top third :ROFLMAO:
     
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  7. Henarar

    Henarar Member

    Location:
    ZumerZet Somerset
    move them on and don't worry about it I spose after all the herds of wild buffalo of whatever didn't give a stuff if every bit was grazed the same height
     
  8. Henarar

    Henarar Member

    Location:
    ZumerZet Somerset
    I spose yours are eating the middle third and leaving the top o_O bloody typical that :sneaky::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
     
  9. Females! :ninja::D
     
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  10. Henarar

    Henarar Member

    Location:
    ZumerZet Somerset
    the cows :sneaky:
     
  11. Blaithin

    Blaithin Member

    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    No, they eat the whole thing. Greedy barstewards!
     
  12. Henarar

    Henarar Member

    Location:
    ZumerZet Somerset
    :D
     
  13. awkward

    awkward Member

    Location:
    kerry ireland
    6
    this is the treadmill I can't seem. to get off. but spring has been a little slow here this year
     
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  14. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    20190515_082231.jpg
    Not many gaps between pats in here, as you can see when there's low light.
    More the odd gap in between them, which (by a law of averages) they should crap on at some point in the future.

    When you think about it, cattle are amazingly good at conservation and self preservation, "nature won't cut her own throat"
     
  15. Blaithin

    Blaithin Member

    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Unless nature is a lemming.
     
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  16. From an Australian perspective ( I will say I have NO experience of dairy, so they might be different ) I have to say I have no understanding of all this talk of short grass, fields looking messy, the desire for everything to be neat & even, single species & looking "park like" . . .
    I just don't get it ?
    I'd love to see cattle standing belly deep or higher in vegetation :)
     
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  17. Blaithin

    Blaithin Member

    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Yet cotton fields are preferred in nice straight lines and even growth. That’s the goal.

    Uniformity is a human desire. It’s why we make fence lines straight and crops monoculture and want all our loaves of bread to look the same on the shelf and all the apples to look perfect.

    You may say from an Aussie perspective but I’ve seen fields in Aus, they’re expected to look just like fields here. The tea fields were a thing of monoculture beauty akin to a vineyard!

    People don't want their front yard to be overgrown as that’s seen as a sign of neglect. That has translated to pastures and fields. Such is the human mindset and culture.
     
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  18. Oh yeah, there is a big aim for uniformity in Cropping fields etc, I agree
    It was just the grazing I was talking about really, not things in general
     
  19. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    I have enough finance cost to keep us reasonably honest. It's about $500/ac per year so there really isn't much room for toys - it's all shiny on a rainy day, after all.

    Copping it today, winds gusting over 140kmh and hosing it down :rolleyes: every farmer I've spoken to has had the same why: "why couldn't we have had some of this in January" :banghead:
    Only lost two trees, a window out of my workshop, and it ripped the back door off the barn - otherwise all is well :)
     
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