Listed building

Dragon

Member
Location
Cornwall
We have a grade 2 listed farmhouse which the cornish rag slate needs rehanging. Was wondering what experience what people have had when reroofing a listed building.
There is is no felt and the roof dips in places, the dips are not original. The old A frames have have become weak a sagged and then propped again with knew A frames 50+years ago (house 300yrs old)
Ideally we would want build back to original alignment, and use knew felt and batten then rehang slate. Obviously I should at some point need to contact the listed building people .
 
We have a grade 2 listed farmhouse which the cornish rag slate needs rehanging. Was wondering what experience what people have had when reroofing a listed building.
There is is no felt and the roof dips in places, the dips are not original. The old A frames have have become weak a sagged and then propped again with knew A frames 50+years ago (house 300yrs old)
Ideally we would want build back to original alignment, and use knew felt and batten then rehang slate. Obviously I should at some point need to contact the listed building people .
You will need listed building consent from the council; you will be required to submit plans detailing what you will be doing and why.
 

br jones

Member
We have a grade 2 listed farmhouse which the cornish rag slate needs rehanging. Was wondering what experience what people have had when reroofing a listed building.
There is is no felt and the roof dips in places, the dips are not original. The old A frames have have become weak a sagged and then propped again with knew A frames 50+years ago (house 300yrs old)
Ideally we would want build back to original alignment, and use knew felt and batten then rehang
Bif bat survsy discovered a roost then you cant do nowt till september.consult a architect or lising officer
 

DKnD

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Exmoor
We just went on and did it. Listing bloke turned up recently to have a general look at the buildings so I said we'd had the roof done and got some other jobs lined up. He told us it was all fine. No need for planning.
Every building needs a roof.
Did use old tiles though. That was a ball ache.
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
So long as the final external look is identical to the original then you should not have a problem with additional felt and insulation. Problem arises when you take that character sagging roof off and realise its only the woodworm holes holding the timber together. Replacing with new oak timber with the joint style used of the original is very expensive and may be insisted on by the conservation officer. Personally I would have a roof structural survey done prior to even thinking of doing anything as it can get really expensive very quickly. The other thing to do is speak with English Heritage so you know where you stand on roof replacement options rather than being told by the conservation officer what they expect you to do.
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
Did our farmhouse roof in 2012. It looked like it needed doing, but when we opened it up it was buggered. Replaced everything bar the queen trusses. It would have helped if whoever did the previous 're-roofing' hadn't nailed new sarking boards on top of the old ones, which made a short flit for the woodworm. Just be advised that it's the kind of job that can grow arms and legs, make sure you have a contingency fund for the 'extras'.
But, I've done my bit for the house (5th generation), hopefully the next time it needs doing I'll be long past caring!
And, I stuck in 3 huge Velux's, just to make sure the buggers from the Council wont list it in the future! ;)
 

JCMaloney

Member
Location
LE3 9EU
Can be a bit of a minefield, especially once you commit to doing something.
Friend of mine has several listed buildings on the Estate, all "treasured" by the locals.
He`s having some restoration work done, all very costly and with onerous terms & conditions set by EH.
Up goes the scaffolding & sheeting, in come the specialist builders.
And then they found a badger sett under one of them that has delayed work whilst they are "re-homed" then it will need under pinning.
In turn that has fuelled the local rumour mill.... "He`s going to demolish it/let it fall down/run out of money".
 

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
Most listed buildings/houses that get sold around here bankrupt 2-3 people/builders before they finally get finished. Once you get involved with all the do-gooders costs triple and some
It's not just listed buildings, it is everything we do. Should be coming to see how they can help not coming to see how to stop you. barstewards
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
going to speak with builder for advice before speaking with listing people.

Builder is the wrong person to speak to. Listed buildings are specialist restoration and a non specialist builder can cost you tens of thousands because they dont know the rules. I even had to to go on a specialist lime mortar and lime plaster course because I could not find a local builder capable of using the traditional compliant materials.
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
Have you joined the Listed Properties Owners Club. They have a couple of events each year in London and Harrogate which are well worth attending and a very long list of specialists who know what there doing on old property. The best bit is advice is normally free.
 

Dragon

Member
Location
Cornwall
Builder is the wrong person to speak to. Listed buildings are specialist restoration and a non specialist builder can cost you tens of thousands because they dont know the rules. I even had to to go on a specialist lime mortar and lime plaster course because I could not find a local builder capable of using the traditional compliant materials.
I have 2 neighbours that are competent tradato on all builders who would be competent in working on a listed building. I would first be asking them what sort of budget I'd need because depending whether it' closer to £50k or £100k will effect how long I leave the roof in it current state.

I'l look into joining the listed building owners club
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
I have 2 neighbours that are competent tradato on all builders who would be competent in working on a listed building. I would first be asking them what sort of budget I'd need because depending whether it' closer to £50k or £100k will effect how long I leave the roof in it current state.

I'l look into joining the listed building owners club

You dont actually need to join you still get a lot of information just by being on there mailing list.
 

Chris F

Staff Member
Media
Location
Hammerwich
We have a grade 2 listed farmhouse which the cornish rag slate needs rehanging. Was wondering what experience what people have had when reroofing a listed building.
There is is no felt and the roof dips in places, the dips are not original. The old A frames have have become weak a sagged and then propped again with knew A frames 50+years ago (house 300yrs old)
Ideally we would want build back to original alignment, and use knew felt and batten then rehang slate. Obviously I should at some point need to contact the listed building people .

Seems to depend on region and listing building team. I had very little problems in worcestershire on my grade 2 listed. Did lots of restoration and small sympathetic changes. However, my friend in Hertfordshire, had a similar thing to you and when they re-did the roof there they had to keep the exact profile as before including the dips. Again not original, added a lot of cost.

Tread carefully.
 

TheTallGuy

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
A big factor can be what the actual "listing" says because that is considered the definitive description of the features that are of historical interest. I know of an old school building where an owner was allowed to clad the bell tower in uPVC because the listing didn't mention that it was timber clad, but the totally unremarkable "open fire place" couldn't be bricked up or otherwise enclosed without going through full planning & heritage committee because it was explicitly mentioned in the listing! :banghead::banghead::banghead:
 

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