On farm public weigh bridge, and charges?

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
We have a 50t commercial weigh bridge on farm, which is tested annually by the council, FoC.
We're not a 'public weigh bridge', but the council 'weights and measures' man suggests we should be, as there are occasional near neighbours who use the bridge.
The upside is a bit of income, the downside is having to be around during 'published hours', having to become a certified 'weigh master' and having all sorts of people lurking around a working yard at no notice.

To those with on farm weigh bridges, are you 'public'?
If not, do you weigh (and charge) trusted businesses?
What is a fair rate per weighing (and tare) for letting someone use £40+k's worth of kit?
I'm just trying to 'weigh up' if the hassle will be worth it.
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
We have a 50t commercial weigh bridge on farm, which is tested annually by the council, FoC.
We're not a 'public weigh bridge', but the council 'weights and measures' man suggests we should be, as there are occasional near neighbours who use the bridge.
The upside is a bit of income, the downside is having to be around during 'published hours', having to become a certified 'weigh master' and having all sorts of people lurking around a working yard at no notice.

To those with on farm weigh bridges, are you 'public'?
If not, do you weigh (and charge) trusted businesses?
What is a fair rate per weighing (and tare) for letting someone use £40+k's worth of kit?
I'm just trying to 'weigh up' if the hassle will be worth it.
£8 inc vat I reluctantly pay
 

Lazy Sod

Member
Location
Warminster
It must must rather depend on your location i.e. how much business you'll get. There's a farmer with a public one near here whose drive opens directly onto the A303, his position is ideal.
 

Eden.Agri.AD

Member
Mixed Farmer
You could get yourself a nice touchscreen monitor & self-weigh software and stick on a contactless card reader for collecting the weighing fee.. bob would be your very uncle.
This would save you need for always being about and just let them weigh themselves but It's just could you justify the payback? paid £5k a couple of years ago for decent weighbridge software. A very viable option tho
 

Werzle

Member
Location
Midlands
One locally charges £15. Ideal if you could have one that people could just pay into a machine and use themselves without you needing to be onsite
 
We have a 50t commercial weigh bridge on farm, which is tested annually by the council, FoC.
We're not a 'public weigh bridge', but the council 'weights and measures' man suggests we should be, as there are occasional near neighbours who use the bridge.
The upside is a bit of income, the downside is having to be around during 'published hours', having to become a certified 'weigh master' and having all sorts of people lurking around a working yard at no notice.

To those with on farm weigh bridges, are you 'public'?
If not, do you weigh (and charge) trusted businesses?
What is a fair rate per weighing (and tare) for letting someone use £40+k's worth of kit?
I'm just trying to 'weigh up' if the hassle will be worth it.
£10
 
That's what I paid last time I used a public with bridge.
Public weighbridge down here used to charge nothing. But then it started costing them 2k a year to be tested. So one locally charges $20.
I acquired a non public bridge with new farm. Neighbors all ring to use it. At this point I allow them. A few have offered to pay me. Most dont. I dont charge but I also dont have a 2k annual inspection fee.
 

Derky

Member
Location
Bucks/oxon
£8.50 plus vat. You need to do a exam by local trading standards. You also must have opening hours and stick to them. You cant just shut up shop for the day.
 

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
25p /t
£8.50 plus vat. You need to do a exam by local trading standards. You also must have opening hours and stick to them. You cant just shut up shop for the day.
That's worse than running a pub or milking cows!

Can you choose your own hours?
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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