Phosphorus Liberator

Zan

Member
Has anyone used or had any dealings with using Phosphorus liberator?
Is it a load of bull crap or does it work?
costs?
 

Bogweevil

Member
According to data sheet based on 'carboxylic acids' which could be formic acid, vinegar, citric acid, lactic acid, all sort of things - the manufacturer specialises in acid ingredients for the food industry.

There is some science that shows citric acid soil treatment makes phosphorus more available, but whether this is cost effective all depends.
 

N.Yorks.

Member
What is your soil P index to begin with? If you're P index 2/3 then all should be fine in an arable situation......

Looked at the claims on the product website and it's interesting that they are claiming you get WW plant weight differences of... wait for it..... 0.3g!!! They don't claim any yield data for treated versus untreated land...... draw your own conclusions!

Better plan: adjust pH to 6.5 (arable), sample a season later to see the effect on P index then apply fert and muck appropriately.
 

Nitrams

Member
Location
Cornwall
According to data sheet based on 'carboxylic acids' which could be formic acid, vinegar, citric acid, lactic acid, all sort of things - the manufacturer specialises in acid ingredients for the food industry.

There is some science that shows citric acid soil treatment makes phosphorus more available, but whether this is cost effective all depends.
Would that make it the same breed as fulvic amd humic acid? I beleive there are some citric acid based wetters but stand to be corrected
 

Yale

Member
Livestock Farmer
Also get the soil biology working so we can access years of locked up phosphorus additions
And to further that getting your ph up to the optimum with lime will ensure your soil biology is far happier.

I don’t sell lime but I use lots of it.

If you are looking at stats look at accurate ones from trials for optimising ph compared to the product.

I can almost guarantee that application of lime will be the most cost effective regarding return.

Have a read.

 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
Get your pH right and then, if you need any, use a more readily available source of phosphate like P-Grow.

And don’t listen to any fertiliser salesman who says it won’t work and that you’ll be better off with tsp
I'm using p grow, and soyl and my agronomist both dislike it saying it's only available in acid solution.
I disagree, right or wrong?
 

Yale

Member
Livestock Farmer
Liming is so underrated.

If it was a new product with a fancy glossy leaflet and @Clive spread it using his Fendt,twin beacons flashing farmers would be falling over themselves to buy it.

Maybe lime needs sexing up a bit,perhaps @Kevtherev and @Cab-over Pete could get together to commission a calendar with the help of @Bald Rick as technical manager. :ROFLMAO:
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
We have been fully reliant on AN and sulphur for the last 30 years. It hasn’t really made a difference to the ph. It might have a short term affect?
If you've not seen it change yet, then it won't do short term.
Our pH always was above 7, in the last twenty years it's got lower and now with pH mapping there's areas that are low 6 high 5. I will say that most field averages are ok though so without mapping I'd still think all was fine and dandy.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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