Tariffs

Tealo

Member
Location
Ipswich
Reciprocation by other countries on our exports, and a lack of resiliance/ diversity when domestic supplies dry up.

Which foodstuff were you thinking of that we have 100% year round assured domestic production?
Our products are cereals and beef. Cereal price is set on a world market that we struggle to make a great deal out of as inputs are a lot higher here. Every time beef looks to be on the rise we here of containers of box meat imported.

I understand we have to import some of both of these and yes food in the shops would go up and hopefully be back to a stage that buying food was a higher percentage of one's wages again.
 
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Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
Our products are cereals and beef. Cereal price is set on a world market that we struggle to
Well, the UK ain't self sufficient in beef, last time I checked, and we don't produce all the varieties of cereal we need either - not so long ago the distillers were importing some special specification of grain for whisky malting, I recall.
 

Tealo

Member
Location
Ipswich
Well, the UK ain't self sufficient in beef, last time I checked, and we don't produce all the varieties of cereal we need either - not so long ago the distillers were importing some special specification of grain for whisky malting, I recall.
I don't know the percentage of imported cereal but surely it's far less than what we can produce so we would be of the better.
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
I don't know the percentage of imported cereal but surely it's far less than what we can produce so we would be of the better.
Can we produce all the grades of grain that we use in this country, and is it possible for us to balance these on an annual basis? I don't know the answer, but I suspect there are some specifications that we can't manage here.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
This can only be a good thing surely, less spare cash to spend on unneeded tat from China or that holiday in Spain.
If the government and nation are serious about helping the environment this ticks the box.
It’s not a good thing for any government to p*ss off their voters by putting the price of food up, and inflation with it.
 
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kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
I don't know the percentage of imported cereal but surely it's far less than what we can produce so we would be of the better.
From what I've read on here, the UK imports milling wheat because it's harder to grow there? Easier to just grow feed wheat and export the extra.
If UK farmers want to provide all of their countries food requirements, aren't they going to have to produce what the customer needs/wants?

With Beef I think your biggest rival is Ireland but it's always US or South American Beef that people get upset about.

You also need other countries to take the cuts of meat that UK buyers don't want, so you need some kind of trade relationship with them, I'd have thought?
 

Tealo

Member
Location
Ipswich
It’s not a good thing for any government to p*ss off their voters by putting the price of food up, and inflation with it.
I agree it seems a very antiquated system political system at the moment, all you need is to put a good spin on it "your saving the planet" "do it for England" and all that bilf. It worked for the sugar tax.
 

Tealo

Member
Location
Ipswich
From what I've read on here, the UK imports milling wheat because it's harder to grow there? Easier to just grow feed wheat and export the extra.
If UK farmers want to provide all of their countries food requirements, aren't they going to have to produce what the customer needs/wants?

With Beef I think your biggest rival is Ireland but it's always US or South American Beef that people get upset about.

You also need other countries to take the cuts of meat that UK buyers don't want, so you need some kind of trade relationship with them, I'd have thought?
Beef wise there aren't many cuts that can't be used here, if we can't make the best loaf of bread we'll have to make do.
An old boy once told me if that's what's put infront of them that's what they'll have to buy.
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
Beef wise there aren't many cuts that can't be used here, if we can't make the best loaf of bread we'll have to make do.
An old boy once told me if that's what's put infront of them that's what they'll have to buy.
If you really want to live in an isolation state without access to items produced abroad, why not try North Korea - how do you think it’s working out for those guys?
 

Tealo

Member
Location
Ipswich
I'm not saying no access, it will just be more expensive and the government get some money out of it aswell. If someone can produce it for less at home👍

These new reforms to agriculture seem to be about exporting pollution and importing cheap food which isn't helping the world in the long run.
 

DaveGrohl

Member
Location
Cumbria
I'm not saying no access, it will just be more expensive and the government get some money out of it aswell. If someone can produce it for less at home👍

These new reforms to agriculture seem to be about exporting pollution and importing cheap food which isn't helping the world in the long run.
You're dangerously close to talking sense. It'll never catch on in the world of politics.
 

Tealo

Member
Location
Ipswich
I'm just trying to see an answer to a problem, the UK can't continue to produce food at UK input prices for World produce prices.

Tariffs seem the best idea so far but I'm probably wrong.
 
We've lived in the EU for quite a few years. Think I'm correct in saying EU set import quotas on foodstuffs, so that is a recognised technique which we have historically been a part of.

Must have some effect to keep prices higher. So maybe the OP asks a reasonable question? But as said, would get reciprocal policies from countries where we export to.

Export tariffs and quotas also commonly used. E.g. Russia.
 

AHDB winding down horticulture and potatoes operations as Ministerial decision awaited

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AHDB has announced yesterday it is winding down significant activities on behalf of the horticulture and potatoes sectors.

While still awaiting a decision on the future by Ministers in England, Scotland and Wales, AHDB wants to reassure levy payers their views have been heard following recent ballots in the two sectors.

AHDB is now stopping programmes of work that could be restarted in the future by grower associations, individual growers or the supply chain. This work includes for example, export market access and promotional international trade event work, consumer marketing campaigns and market pricing and insight information. AHDB will continue to deliver limited emergency work on pests and diseases, including the Extension of Authorisation for Minor Use (EAMU)’s and some...
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