TED20 Engine Refurb.

Discussion in 'Classic Machinery' started by DrWazzock, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. Netherfield

    Netherfield Member

    Location:
    West Yorkshire
  2. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    Foden 2 stroke, were they a flat engine (Root's) like in the TS3 Commers, I wonder?
     
  3. Vizslaman

    Vizslaman Member

    Location:
    Hampshire
    HI Mursal
    No they were straight 6 but each pot had it's own head as I recall.
    They were the mickey mouse cab fodens with 12 speed range change gearboxes.
     
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  4. Vizslaman

    Vizslaman Member

    Location:
    Hampshire
  5. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    Very sweet, proper truck engines ............
    Plenty of gears so that had to help, you probably had to keep them reved to get any power.
     
  6. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    Thanks @Netherfield and @Vizslaman very interesting, we only ever had the 180 Gardner over here that I was aware off, in the ERF's and Atkinson's. Not many Foden's here at all. Some even had Cummins and a very few Rolls Royce. All (or most) illegal imports from your part of the world, they were known as "swimmers"
     
  7. Vizslaman

    Vizslaman Member

    Location:
    Hampshire
    Yes you had to keep the revs up, at night we could hear the 2 strokes coming when we were in the workshop.

    The Foden 2 stroke became famous or rather infamous when one blew up in the News of The World power boat.

    The biggest Gardner I ever rebuilt was an 8 cylinder fitted in a whitefish trawler
     
  8. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    That was unfortunate .............
     
  9. Netherfield

    Netherfield Member

    Location:
    West Yorkshire
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  10. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    I can feel a full refurb coming on. No point messing about only to have something else fail and more damage occur. That is unless the crank has already been taken down to minimum diameter. I know a bloke with a metal spraying set up, but don't know if he can do centreless.

    If it was my own tractor I'd just do it, but doing it for friends is a bit more complicated regarding costs.
     
  11. John 1594

    John 1594 Member

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    If it starts reasonably well and doesnt breath much id be very inclined to leave the top end alone, ie rings, head etc

    problem nowdays, especially if the tractor is only used for light work, it getting it worked hard enough to bed the new rings on properly. You often end up with the scenario of the new rings not bedding in right as they glaze up under light work, and the tractor ends up harder to start than before it was rebuilt
     
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  12. MrNoo

    MrNoo Member

    Location:
    Cirencester
    Agree re the rings but if mine, I'd have the head off, get the seats done at the very least, face the head, new gasket. That way you can check the bores and also be 100% sure you're not loosing any compression through the valves/gasket, and it'll mean you'll have to do the tappets (also a chance to check the wear on the rocker pads too)
     
  13. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    But will he (your friend) thank you for a full rebuild and all the hassle that entails for you, probably not?
     
  14. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Foden fd series engines drove many machines , from trucks to fast training boats. They were "staybolt" engines, two stroke and scavenge blown. The largest I worked on were the 12 cyl`s fitted as manoeuvring engines in the fast training boats at Portland navy base. These were two six cyl units on a common sump, driving into a transfer box, then down to a "Z" drive on the prop shafts. There were two of them, and the main engines were Proteus gas turbines, these we were not allowed to run in harbour, the exhausts( 14" blow torches if a wet start had taken place) did funny things to other boats if they got a bit too close!
     
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  15. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    Two crankshafts?
    Had they exhaust valves?
     
  16. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Yes, two crankshafts, fuel pumps etc. The CAV "NN" injection pumps were hyd governed and the governor in the right hand,( from behind the engine), controlled the left hand pump as well.They had two exhaust valves per cylinder, operating on the Kadenacy(excuse spelling) principle the first part of the valve lift taking place in a pocket, then full lift cleared this, giving the effect of fast valve opening. The common sump was a problem, prone to major oil leaks, which you dont want in a boat! The engine had to be removed to fix this, and that involved removing the wheel house/engine room deckhead, to do that several hundred bolts had to be removed, and all by hand, no windy guns then!
     
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  17. Vizslaman

    Vizslaman Member

    Location:
    Hampshire
    @Ley253 Those FD6 2 strokes did sound sweet though on full song
     
  18. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    We are/were limited in our 2 stroke experiences, but the flat TS3 in the old Commers did sound well, even the younger Detroit Diesels in the Bedfords, weren't bad sound wise.
    What had those little 4 cylinder Gardner's fitted, that got grafted into the Massey's?
     
  19. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Indeed they did, as did the commer.
     
  20. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    I dont think "Little" is a word that can be used to describe any Gardner! Short or long maybe, but the bits in between varied only in the number! 2, 4,6, cyls! Good engines if a bit dated. I won several tots when in HMS Protector being able to start the 6LW generator engines on the starting handle.
     
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