Triton direct seed drill

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
I don’t think it needs any other badge on it. It’s got the capability to completely knock this type of drill market into touch and take over because it really is that good.
From the pictures I’ve seen it, which is a lot it looks very good but for any earlier drilling looks too high disturbance and like it would lose a lot of moisture.
 

Deutzdx3

Member
Remove the owners Twitter from him and this drill would sell well, don’t think he takes criticism to well and blocks people for no good reason. Not really the way to push sales. Sure when you have one of his drills he is at the other end of the phone.
 
How was the mustard dealt with, and was it still green when drilling? Toying with the idea that I could grow some vetch and radish overwinter then sow barley straight in the following spring.
Topped some of it and rolled a bit. Then glyphosated it all. Sewage cake was applied and then drilled.

The mustard bit that was rolled looks the worst at the moment.
 
Pics 1-4 November sown wheat into a catch cover crop planted in sept. Pointless though so won’t be bothering with that again.

Pucs 5-6 March sown into flooded over winter stubble. Not the nicest soil and it’ll be rolled this week.
 

Attachments

Hjwise

Member
Mixed Farmer
Pics 1-4 November sown wheat into a catch cover crop planted in sept. Pointless though so won’t be bothering with that again.

Pucs 5-6 March sown into flooded over winter stubble. Not the nicest soil and it’ll be rolled this week.
Looks good. What’s your alternative to the catch crop? Drill direct in to stubble in November?
 

Hjwise

Member
Mixed Farmer
It was the first time trying a catch so I just won’t bother again. A totally pointless exercise in my view. To be honest I’m becoming more sceptical about cover crops in an arable rotation full stop. I think it’s just the latest fad.
So will you drill earlier or just leave as stubble?
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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