VERY low Milk Ureas ! Down to .007 %

I have never seen ureas this low 0.011 last week .007 this .



Dropped parlour cake to 16% CP when we turned out nights a couple of weeks ago,

Just grass and 6 Kgs cake, mainly calved since Jan 1st , averaging 30 l/ head 3.56 %P but only 3.6% F the lowest fats we have seen in years.

The grass has all had 50 units N ( 62 Kgs/ Ha ?) as ammonium nitrate ,3 weeks ago

I guess it means the grass just hasn’t taken up any N.

Any one else got ureas this low.? I would expect 0.025 up at this time of year.
 

PDB

Member
Livestock Farmer
Yes snap. Been hovering around 0.006 to 0.01 for 3 weeks

a result of the dry
 
Very low here to, all under 20 in the last week with some as low as 4.

I'm feeding exactly the same as to you, we've been out day day and night for 10 weeks and I've just upped the cake to 6 kg of 16% because I've got bugger all grass.
 

Tirglas

Member
Location
West wales
Been down single figures past 10 days and sub 20 all month. Last was 6 lowest was 3.

Also the cows lick and chew everything like mad (did it last dry spell too) getting extra salt, and mag phos lick in yard and field no change. They are eating stones as well! And if there's no shock in the fence its chewing gum!!
 

Wee Willy

Member
Location
Tyrone
Been down single figures past 10 days and sub 20 all month. Last was 6 lowest was 3.

Also the cows lick and chew everything like mad (did it last dry spell too) getting extra salt, and mag phos lick in yard and field no change. They are eating stones as well! And if there's no shock in the fence its chewing gum!!
That’s phosphorus deficiency. Lot of talk over here about it. Related to the cold no-growth situation where grass turns purple. Need to supplement with phosphorus or conception will be poo.
 
That’s phosphorus deficiency. Lot of talk over here about it. Related to the cold no-growth situation where grass turns purple. Need to supplement with phosphorus or conception will be poo.
Interesting.

Are the low ureas a symptom of low phosphorus or just the licking and chewing?

I’m worrying that the low ureas signal a serious underlying problem that I am so far oblivious to.
 

DairyGrazing

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North West
That’s phosphorus deficiency. Lot of talk over here about it. Related to the cold no-growth situation where grass turns purple. Need to supplement with phosphorus or conception will be poo.
Thats interesting because after Christmas some of our drys milkers and heifers were liking urine on the yard, chewing the timbers and dried muck. Vet said it would be salt or phos.

We tested them but they never sent the samples off we re did them last week and they came back as normal but the cows served during that period had poor conception compared to before Christmas.

I may do it any way how do you supplement for phos?
 

Yonlass

Member
Thats interesting because after Christmas some of our drys milkers and heifers were liking urine on the yard, chewing the timbers and dried muck. Vet said it would be salt or phos.

We tested them but they never sent the samples off we re did them last week and they came back as normal but the cows served during that period had poor conception compared to before Christmas.

I may do it any way how do you supplement for phos?
Hi phos minerals
 

rusty

Member
Very low ureas and Low butter fats but good milk proteins have been common the last few weeks amongst the members of my discussion group (Derbyshire/Leicestershire based). We have put it down to low take up of nitrogen fertiliser due to the cold dry weather, similar to last spring.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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