Water Resource Management

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
I'm confused.
I was considering applying for a water abstraction licence from one of the watercourses that runs through the farm.
I have read through the EA Abstraction Licensing Strategy for my area (Lincolnshire) and it implies that no licences will be granted as water availability is restricted even at times of maximum flow (Q30) and that the only way to gain any abstraction would be to buy unused rights off a current holder.
How can this possibly make sense when we had massive flows through here for much of the winter and folk downstream living in fear of banks overtopping, plus they have had to build a flood sacrifice area just downstream of us before the town? Surely allowing us to fill a reservoir at times of high flow during the winter would help everybody?
It just doesn't make sense to me, but if that's how it is then that's how it is and I don't want to waste time on an application.
 

Hindsight

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
I'm confused.
I was considering applying for a water abstraction licence from one of the watercourses that runs through the farm.
I have read through the EA Abstraction Licensing Strategy for my area (Lincolnshire) and it implies that no licences will be granted as water availability is restricted even at times of maximum flow (Q30) and that the only way to gain any abstraction would be to buy unused rights off a current holder.
How can this possibly make sense when we had massive flows through here for much of the winter and folk downstream living in fear of banks overtopping, plus they have had to build a flood sacrifice area just downstream of us before the town? Surely allowing us to fill a reservoir at times of high flow during the winter would help everybody?
It just doesn't make sense to me, but if that's how it is then that's how it is and I don't want to waste time on an application.
Winter storage into a resevoir likely. Speak with the EA licensing folk at Lincoln. They will advise. OK folk.
 
Why wouldn't it?
I cant think of one spring down here where I farm that hasn't seen most croppers irrigate ww or osr.
Some under very very expensive lateral move or pivot irrigators. (Think in excess of £1000 / ac purchase price). Plus the delivery cost of the water, plus having to also purchase water in some years. Yet. These guys are the ones chasing more land. Buying up ex dairies at record land prices to convert back to cropping.
And dont forget our yields aren't what you get historically..... But a crop finished is better than a complete write off.

(Same rules apply here basically.... you want water rights.....you have to buy it from someone else.....)
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Why wouldn't it?
I cant think of one spring down here where I farm that hasn't seen most croppers irrigate ww or osr.
Some under very very expensive lateral move or pivot irrigators. (Think in excess of £1000 / ac purchase price). Plus the delivery cost of the water, plus having to also purchase water in some years. Yet. These guys are the ones chasing more land. Buying up ex dairies at record land prices to convert back to cropping.
And dont forget our yields aren't what you get historically..... But a crop finished is better than a complete write off.

(Same rules apply here basically.... you want water rights.....you have to buy it from someone else.....)
True, if a bit of water means the difference between a crop and no crop then it's worth it.
 

fudge

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire.
I'm confused.
I was considering applying for a water abstraction licence from one of the watercourses that runs through the farm.
I have read through the EA Abstraction Licensing Strategy for my area (Lincolnshire) and it implies that no licences will be granted as water availability is restricted even at times of maximum flow (Q30) and that the only way to gain any abstraction would be to buy unused rights off a current holder.
How can this possibly make sense when we had massive flows through here for much of the winter and folk downstream living in fear of banks overtopping, plus they have had to build a flood sacrifice area just downstream of us before the town? Surely allowing us to fill a reservoir at times of high flow during the winter would help everybody?
It just doesn't make sense to me, but if that's how it is then that's how it is and I don't want to waste time on an application.
Do you have a reservoir ATM? I just being nosy, I don’t have any knowledge of the regulations!
 

Forkdriver

Member
Livestock Farmer
Damaging abstraction is being tackled by the EA by way of compensation for permanent rights removed or varied. Variation or revocation of time limited abstraction is not compensated as the licence wont be renewed. If winter abstraction can be carried out for storage then it is likely to be approved provided that it does not result in damage. The financial value of a licence to abstract far exceeds it's costs.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Do you have a reservoir ATM? I just being nosy, I don’t have any knowledge of the regulations!
I have no reservoir at the moment but during the winter there is a serious flooding risk to the inhabitants downstream. They have done a certain amount to alleviate the flood risk by creating sacrificial flood plain just downstream of us in forestry land but I would have thought a more beneficial solution to all of us would have been a reservoir to fill up during excess winter flow but what would I know?
Anyway I’ll make some enquiries. I don’t think I could justify the entire capital cost myself but there might be some kind of funding available to help out. Anyway, we will see.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
We are in a catchment sensitive area as well. Some sort of desilting scheme might also be incorporated. Really it’s a bigger project than a small farmer can achieve. A big reservoir further downstream from us to catch more tributaries would be the ideal solution. This water could then be used for irrigation more widely. There is one reservoir downstream of us but it holds nothing like enough water to cope with excess winter flow.
 
We are in a catchment sensitive area as well. Some sort of desilting scheme might also be incorporated. Really it’s a bigger project than a small farmer can achieve. A big reservoir further downstream from us to catch more tributaries would be the ideal solution. This water could then be used for irrigation more widely. There is one reservoir downstream of us but it holds nothing like enough water to cope with excess winter flow.
No better time than when dry to start.....Call a meeting (or else find someone willing and able. And garner support from surrounding farmers.....) irrigation didnt just happen here.....

 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
They are very much against in line storage for that reason. I can see why and wouldn’t go down that route though it would provide better silt settling.
We installed our reservoir as a surge pool to protect the Listed farmhouse from flooding. EA helpful on design and application. Local council not so helpful until they realised it had EA backing for flood prevention. Has actually worked so far.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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