Worsening blackgrass/ryegrass problem.

lady luck

New Member
I'm in my fifth year of strip tilling following a more traditional plough/power harrow based system. I had some decent results in the first few years but the last two wet autumn /winters have not been so great.
My main problem is the blackgrass is getting out of hand, I don't think my predrilling passes with the stubble rake are aggressive enough. On the light land ryegrass is an increasing problem as well, I don't think spreading my FYM without incorporating before drilling is helping with this.
I think I need to buy a shallow drag/cultivator of some kind to work the top inch of soil as soon as I can after harvest and then stir it around with my rake a couple of times before drilling. I've already invested a lot of money in all this so didn't want to buy anything shiny and new, I'm hoping something old and cheap will do the job for me.
I would appreciate any advice on what cultivator/drag would work well in this situation and any other suggestions you might have. Thanks.
 

4course

Member
Location
north yorks
go back to the plough, shorten the rotation between non cereal cropping , never let grass leys set seed and if its really that bad some spring cropping, and put as much back if not more than you take out, just look at how our forebears made a system work for millenia ,its not rocket science despite what some try to make it, p.s ive already got my coat
 

thorpe

Member
go back to the plough, shorten the rotation between non cereal cropping , never let grass leys set seed and if its really that bad some spring cropping, and put as much back if not more than you take out, just look at how our forebears made a system work for millenia ,its not rocket science despite what some try to make it, p.s ive already got my coat
against our agronomists advice , just bought a new plough! are we right or wrong? i dont know , dont want to plough everything but winter b on heavier ground is a waste of time with the trio in a wet time but we dont know its going to be wet when we start a cultivation stratagy ,a poor crop lets all the grassweeds in no matter what establishment is used.
 

thorpe

Member
since buying a co4 only had 1 season when it worked for everything , always said we would never sell the combi! but i do feel if its not fit for the horsh we shouldnt be drilling . having said that autumn 2019 no co4 drilling autumn 2020 50% co4 50% combi.
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
go back to the plough, shorten the rotation between non cereal cropping , never let grass leys set seed and if its really that bad some spring cropping, and put as much back if not more than you take out, just look at how our forebears made a system work for millenia ,its not rocket science despite what some try to make it, p.s ive already got my coat
Taxis outside with hes motor running (y)
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
I'd buy a weaving gd.
I've used it for 3 crops now, after about 7 with the old KV tineseeder.
I had a couple of right royal feck ups with BG using the KV, but on the whole I was treading water or slightly gaining ground against it.
Since using the gd I'm definitely gaining ground, to the point that I'd almost say I'm breaking the back of the war.
If you want to win the war stop moving soil, you just keep bringing seed up, and have a zero tolerance on the stuff.
Chuck the kitchen sink at it for a few years to get on top.
I've just finished doing the T2 , and rogue as I go with little glyphosate sprayers. 50 acres a day isn't too bad on the whole, it's made much easier with auto steer though, it allows you to concentrate on looking for BG and anything else out of place.


Not what you wanted to hear no doubt.
 

robs1

Member
Have a drive round the country, you wont feel so bad, I dont think I've ever seen so much bg in wheat as this year, you can see it in fields a long way from roads I think most have taken a big backwards step this year, saw some ryegrass in a field that hasn't grown grass since at least the early 1970's.
 

lady luck

New Member
The reason BG is bad is because everyone got panicky and started drilling earlier last year.
They all thought they'd cracked it and got drilled up before it rained.
It's very evident now that was not a good thing round here.
I drilled 18-20th October in wet ground, the ground only got wetter after that and the wheat struggled to get established, I think this made the BG problem worse. Managed to get Liberator on pre-em, wanted to get Avadex on as well but couldn't. I think I need to ignore the late drilling idea. Drill earlier in better conditions , get rolled properly and get all pre-ems on properly then have a strong established crop ready to face the winter.
 

alomy75

Member
Claydon hybrid. A couple of passes with the stubble rake beforehand. Drilled 18-20th October. think I need to go earlier, see above.
It’s a tough call but as said above, drilling date is probably our best tool against bg...you could come forward a bit-most work I’ve seen suggests bg germination in a ‘normal’ year drops off once you’re into October. I’ve no personal experience with a Claydon, a neighbour drilled some beans for us with a hybrid last year...they came well but they seem to move a lot of soil and that can only encourage bg...(although that was working deep for beans to be fair) I have seen a lower disturbance Tillso leg conversion on a Claydon (to replace the leading tine)...might be a worth a look? As for the rake, we used to use one but wasn’t convinced about its ability to kill blackgrass; Claydon terrastar (if you like your Claydon stuff) does a bit more or a sampo? We use a rabe field bird which is a bit like a mounted carrier which moves the whole width really shallow (?)
 

NI agri-food stakeholder groups discuss climate change bill with committee

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The Livestock and Meat Commission (LMC) recently submitted oral evidence to members of the Stormont Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (AERA) committee on the content and potential impact of the Northern Ireland Climate Change Bill (No.2).

This draft legislation was recently introduced to the Northern Ireland Assembly by the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) in conjunction with agriculture minister, Edwin Poots.

“We were accompanied by representatives from a wide range of food industry bodies, including the Northern Ireland Meat Exporters’ Association,the Ulster Farmers’ Union [UFU], Northern...
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