Carrot price and irrigated yield?

Anyone hazard a guess to average price of carrots? Just a ball-park figure.

Need it for a crop-loss claim.

I'm using £130/t for an average potato price.

Edit. Also difference between irrigated yield vs non irrigation.

Thanks.
 
Irrigated yield is about 30t/acre. I think, but don’t quote me, the price is more like £350/t. Not sure where I got that from though.
 
Price would vary though the year with the highest premium for over wintered late harvested (about now) and early lifted grown under polythene, lifted June onwards.
Yes, I can understand there would be a big difference through the season, think straw costs £1,000/acre? Maybe more this last year! And early lifters with yield penalty.

So where does this leave October ex field carrots? I haven't got a clue. Are we talking £100, £150, £200, £300, £350...?

Spuds can easily range from £20 to £400, but if someone said £135 that might be a reasonable ex field price to base a claim on. I've used £135/t @ 4t/acre yield loss for not having irrigation available.

I need a realistic and reasonable price to use for difference between irrigated and unirrigated carrot crop. And average yield loss for no irrigation.

I think processing carrots can yield well in excess of 40t/acre? But packing carrots would be lower yielding?
 
Yes, I can understand there would be a big difference through the season, think straw costs £1,000/acre? Maybe more this last year! And early lifters with yield penalty.

So where does this leave October ex field carrots? I haven't got a clue. Are we talking £100, £150, £200, £300, £350...?

Spuds can easily range from £20 to £400, but if someone said £135 that might be a reasonable ex field price to base a claim on. I've used £135/t @ 4t/acre yield loss for not having irrigation available.

I need a realistic and reasonable price to use for difference between irrigated and unirrigated carrot crop. And average yield loss for no irrigation.

I think processing carrots can yield well in excess of 40t/acre? But packing carrots would be lower yielding?
As to specific numbers, I would be clueless, sorry.
From what I see locally, the packers are also the growers, so the actual ex field price would depend on which part of the business they want to make the profit.
Having said that, the local fields of early carrots, that I see are having their polythene removed today, will be going to all the major packers, from Lancs, Notts and Cambs, often from the same field.
@slim shiny might be able to help.
 
As to specific numbers, I would be clueless, sorry.
From what I see locally, the packers are also the growers, so the actual ex field price would depend on which part of the business they want to make the profit.
Having said that, the local fields of early carrots, that I see are having their polythene removed today, will be going to all the major packers, from Lancs, Notts and Cambs, often from the same field.
@slim shiny might be able to help.
Thanks for the help.

I guess not much of an open market price, most being on contract direct to supermarkets and end users.
 
Yes, I can understand there would be a big difference through the season, think straw costs £1,000/acre? Maybe more this last year! And early lifters with yield penalty.

So where does this leave October ex field carrots? I haven't got a clue. Are we talking £100, £150, £200, £300, £350...?

Spuds can easily range from £20 to £400, but if someone said £135 that might be a reasonable ex field price to base a claim on. I've used £135/t @ 4t/acre yield loss for not having irrigation available.

I need a realistic and reasonable price to use for difference between irrigated and unirrigated carrot crop. And average yield loss for no irrigation.

I think processing carrots can yield well in excess of 40t/acre? But packing carrots would be lower yielding?
In a normal year straw is that. This year even forward buying it’s cost then more like £1800/acre.
So what’s actually happened? Have they over stayed?
 

melted welly

Member
Location
DD9.
So many variables, off farm, dirty, in bulk, could be anywhere between say £80 and £200+/t ex.
depends on season and time of lifting, open crop or covered, prepack or processing end use, grade out % at washing.

for a very rough guide look up the government wholesale veg prices for intended week of supply:


and make an allowance for value added by washing and packing.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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