Farms for sale

midlandslad

Member
Location
Midlands
As we enter into the busy time of year for farm sales, is everyone seeing an increase in farms in the local area or are people sitting tight?

Recent years have seen a drop in farm sales with uncertainty surrounding Brexit and Farm support. Now with all this a lot more certain, will we see an increase in farm sales.
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
Few bits within 20 mile for sale but they’ve also been there a few years now 🤷🏻‍♂️
Genuine Farm Dispersal Machinery sales are 1 in a decade now, smaller farms either put all their stuff in collective’s or the farm taking over takes most of the kit on too, last dispersal I went to was 2004 and I bought a Twose Bale spike for £15, still use it now 👍🏻
 

Yale

Member
Livestock Farmer
Demand from amenity buyers looking for a new lifestyle are on the increase.

Foreign holidays are now less attractive and folk maybe want their ‘little bit of ........ (insert England ,Wales ,Scotland ,N.Ireland.) to ‘escape to the country’.
 
I will be surprised if there isn't a greater number this Autumn when the "retirement scheme" (lump sum exit scheme) becomes clearer.
Obviously it will depend on how it will be taxed, but for many it will be a golden opportunity to retire with enough to be comfortable.
It will also be an opportunity for landlords to consider selling if the tenant gets out.

Probably more so in livestock areas than arable as higher stock prices will also give an opportunity to increase retirement funds.
 

GeorgeK

Member
Location
Leicestershire
Compared to houses farms are starting to look good value. A cool million buys surprisingly little house and garden now. I'm also wondering if ag ties will be lifted or changed because a lot of farmers won't get their main income from farming when subs are gone, so there would be farm houses with no one eligible to live in them?
 

midlandslad

Member
Location
Midlands
Surely the drop in BPS and increasing age of farmers will push more sales forward as the older generation look to get out rather than embrace a new era of agriculture?
 

GeorgeK

Member
Location
Leicestershire
Surely the drop in BPS and increasing age of farmers will push more sales forward as the older generation look to get out rather than embrace a new era of agriculture?
Plenty of older farmers will carry on winding down slowly rather than sell. Steadily contract more out, if the cash starts running low they can offload an outlying paddock or two for crazy money and free up a few hundred thou more to farm through
 
Even if there was an increase in supply of farms/land for sale, I can't see prices dropping, if anything they're on the way up again in my opinion.

A 50 acre block of rough grazing land was sold this winter here (West Midlands), nothing special and no development potential, you could silage it but you wouldn't want to grow crops on it. Spoke to the agent the other day who sold it and it had made £11,500 an acre, he said he could have sold it 20 times over, he even had town folk from the nearby village after it bidding £9-10k an acre, a large dairy farm bought it in the end but it just shows what funds are out there. Half a million isn't much money now to some retired people, and as @GeorgeK has noted, a half decent house in the countryside can soak up the best part of £1m.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

  • 438
  • 0


Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
Top