Feeding molasses inside

TexelBen

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
We house lambing ewes around Xmas, and turn them out just after lambing in early April. Stops them destroying our land as we're on heavy clay.
Last year we fed hay and cake.
Would haylage and molasses do them in the earlier stages then swap to cake later on?
 
We house lambing ewes around Xmas, and turn them out just after lambing in early April. Stops them destroying our land as we're on heavy clay.
Last year we fed hay and cake.
Would haylage and molasses do them in the earlier stages then swap to cake later on?
What type of ewes do you have? If they are Texel ewes then yes more than likely. I use promol 20 for inlamb ewes which is molasses and urea for the protein. It is not as good as using cake in my experience but that will be depending on intakes and haulage quality which varies a lot in my case
 

TexelBen

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
What type of ewes do you have? If they are Texel ewes then yes more than likely. I use promol 20 for inlamb ewes which is molasses and urea for the protein. It is not as good as using cake in my experience but that will be depending on intakes and haulage quality which varies a lot in my case

They are mainly texel and texel cross ewes, will probably start scaling around 6-8 weeks prelambing, just wanted to cut down the cake bill a bit!
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Whenever I've tried using liquid feed inside with a ball feeder, intakes have been much higher than outside and they've squitted on it a bit. I always thought they were taking it out of boredom. It certainly reduces the need for concentrates, but if intakes are too high then the cost saving isn't much to shout about. The triplets will take more though, which is better for them holding condition, rather than everything having the same ration if you don't separate them.

I dread to think what intakes would be like with straight cane molasses, or how loose they'd be.
 
Whenever I've tried using liquid feed inside with a ball feeder, intakes have been much higher than outside and they've squitted on it a bit. I always thought they were taking it out of boredom. It certainly reduces the need for concentrates, but if intakes are too high then the cost saving isn't much to shout about. The triplets will take more though, which is better for them holding condition, rather than everything having the same ration if you don't separate them.

I dread to think what intakes would be like with straight cane molasses, or how loose they'd be.
The urea ones are supposed to be self limiting. Our sheep take less of this than the pure cane. When we reach late January the weather can be extreme here and intakes are higher due to us basically feeding the weather. I could do a calculation per head but it’s not accurate as sheep are getting other things too. In busy times liquid feed is a good way to reduce daily labour here.
 

Gator

Never Forgotten
Honorary Member
Location
Lancashire
I reckon @Gator sometimes feeds it inside??
Aye
20180203_143352.jpg
20180203_143423.jpg
20180203_144345.jpg
 
Location
Ceredigion
Whenever I've tried using liquid feed inside with a ball feeder, intakes have been much higher than outside and they've squitted on it a bit. I always thought they were taking it out of boredom. It certainly reduces the need for concentrates, but if intakes are too high then the cost saving isn't much to shout about. The triplets will take more though, which is better for them holding condition, rather than everything having the same ration if you don't separate them.

I dread to think what intakes would be like with straight cane molasses, or how loose they'd be.
I tried blocks inside. They stood around the block all day until it had gone -same with liquid. No idea why they had loads of grub in front of them
 

Make Tax Digital Software Poll

  • Quickbooks

    Votes: 33 16.8%
  • Sage

    Votes: 20 10.2%
  • Xero

    Votes: 89 45.4%
  • Other

    Votes: 54 27.6%

Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

  • 136
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
Top