Fodder beet

Herefordshirefarmer4321

Member
Mixed Farmer
Looking at the benefits of feeding fodder beet to our growing cattle (8-14mth) and finishing cattle. Is it worth adding to either of the mixes. And how often can I grow it in the same field?
Thanks in advance
 

Great In Grass

Member
Location
Cornwall.
It's not recommended to follow beet with another crop of beet you need a two-year gap ideally.

It's low in minerals and protein so will need balancing. Due to the sugar content, however, intakes are good which leads to good animal performance.

I've attached some info for you.
 

Attachments

Stuart J

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
It's not recommended to follow beet with another crop of beet you need a two-year gap ideally.

It's low in minerals and protein so will need balancing. Due to the sugar content, however, intakes are good which leads to good animal performance.

I've attached some info for you.
Why not beet followed by beet? What's the problems?
 
Quite a few do two consecutive years of beet round here, followed by a long break.
The second year crops are always noticeably poorer and dirtier.
Yes same here, can never understand why, it might take years to get rid of the problems caused. Wheras one year in five is so sustainable.

To yet the real benifits though totally virgin land, the beet grows with such vigour. Local farmer bought a farm with a beet quota but the land was totally beet sick. So he grew the beet on his home farm 20 miles away from the nearesr sugar beet & on heavy grade three soil he had the highest yeilding crop of sugar beet in Yorkshire. Locally (this was 25 years ago) we all went to look at this foreign crop, now fodder beet is much more common.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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