Glyphosate again

ski

Member


I am not sure what to make of this piece, does it have any merit or is based on nothing? I like most use it but worry there may be more downsides than we've been made aware of yet also think that most stuff like this is nonsense.
 

SRRC

Member
Location
West Somerset
While it's prudent to take concerns about food safety seriously I suggest you take a trip into the wierd world of the conspiracy theorists in the discussion below the article in order to understand where this stuff comes from.
Also note the request to contribute to support the campaign, that's the main reason for this sort of article, not that there's any new science.
 

Bogweevil

Member


I am not sure what to make of this piece, does it have any merit or is based on nothing? I like most use it but worry there may be more downsides than we've been made aware of yet also think that most stuff like this is nonsense.

It's piffle, to use a technical term.
 
Location
southwest
Got to ask, why is glyphosate the most widely used herbicide?

As it kills everything with one application, common sense would say you use it once on an area of land and it's several years before the weed burden is enough to justify using it again.

Or is it being used inappropriately?
 
Location
Ceredigion
Got to ask, why is glyphosate the most widely used herbicide?

As it kills everything with one application, common sense would say you use it once on an area of land and it's several years before the weed burden is enough to justify using it again.

Or is it being used inappropriately?
You can't realy direct drill without it , and it's better for the environment not to plough , so choose your weapons carefully
 

robs1

Member
Got to ask, why is glyphosate the most widely used herbicide?

As it kills everything with one application, common sense would say you use it once on an area of land and it's several years before the weed burden is enough to justify using it again.

Or is it being used inappropriately?
It only kills what it lands on, it has no residual activity so new weeds will grow very quickly so ay least once a year treatment is needed if you dd to give the new seeds a clean start.
 
Location
southwest
I'm old enough to remember when Glyphosate first became available. At that time it was a game changer in dealing with weeds that were difficult to kill by traditional cultivations, docks and couch grass for example.

What seems to have changed is that it now seems to be the "go to" weedkiller for all weeds-most of which can be easily controlled by cultivations. Why does it now seem to be necessary to spray off grassland before ploughing-can no one set up a plough anymore? And using glyphosate to "ripen" cereals-what is that about?

If it gets banned, farmer will have only themselves to blame due it's inappropriate and over use.
 
Location
Ceredigion
I'm old enough to remember when Glyphosate first became available. At that time it was a game changer in dealing with weeds that were difficult to kill by traditional cultivations, docks and couch grass for example.

What seems to have changed is that it now seems to be the "go to" weedkiller for all weeds-most of which can be easily controlled by cultivations. Why does it now seem to be necessary to spray off grassland before ploughing-can no one set up a plough anymore? And using glyphosate to "ripen" cereals-what is that about?

If it gets banned, farmer will have only themselves to blame due it's inappropriate and over use.
Ploughing won't kill docks, the No1 problem on a dairy farm , if you don't use roundup yiu will end up spraying later with something a lot less effective
 
I was pleasantly surprised many (20+) years ago by the effectiveness of pre-harvest application on feed wheats and grasses before silage and the subsequent shortening of time to planting the next crop, however more recently I was horrified to learn that milling wheats could be sprayed with glyphosate and see the combine in within 3 or 4 days.
Perhaps, just perhaps the massive rise in “gluten intolerance” is actually glyphosate intolerance - Folk have been eating wheat products for 1000’s of years but mass “gluten intolerance” seems to have occurred during the pre-harvest glyphosate period.
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
The ploughees round here use just as much glyphosate as the direct drillers, apart from the organic guy, who gets a lot more for his produce.
 

robs1

Member
I was pleasantly surprised many (20+) years ago by the effectiveness of pre-harvest application on feed wheats and grasses before silage and the subsequent shortening of time to planting the next crop, however more recently I was horrified to learn that milling wheats could be sprayed with glyphosate and see the combine in within 3 or 4 days.
Perhaps, just perhaps the massive rise in “gluten intolerance” is actually glyphosate intolerance - Folk have been eating wheat products for 1000’s of years but mass “gluten intolerance” seems to have occurred during the pre-harvest glyphosate period.
Legal gap after pre harvest is 7 days. Not that much is used pre harvest and I've been and advocate of that use bring banned, however this time Ive used it on spring wheat as a lot of late rubbish has come through it after the mid august storms, I'm sure our northern members need it quite often for later harvests.
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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